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The role of traditional cereal/legume/fruit‐based multimixes in weaning in developing countries

The role of traditional cereal/legume/fruit‐based multimixes in weaning in developing countries The weaning period is a crucial stage in the growth and development of the infant and child. The timing of weaning, the choice of foods, their methods of preparation, and how weanlings are fed, all affect the outcome. The commercial preparation of weaning foods and the fortification of some traditional foods are seen by some as the most sustainable and cost‐effective means of alleviating micronutrient deficiencies among infants and children. This may be true in industrialized countries, but the same cannot necessarily be said of poor, developing countries. Demonstrates that, even in poor communities, it is possible to combine scant food resources in a cost‐effective way to formulate multimixes which would meet energy, protein and micronutrient needs, without fortification. Proposes that such approaches can be used in community nutrition education programmes to help reduce childhood malnutrition and in emergency feeding programmes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

The role of traditional cereal/legume/fruit‐based multimixes in weaning in developing countries

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346650010319688
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The weaning period is a crucial stage in the growth and development of the infant and child. The timing of weaning, the choice of foods, their methods of preparation, and how weanlings are fed, all affect the outcome. The commercial preparation of weaning foods and the fortification of some traditional foods are seen by some as the most sustainable and cost‐effective means of alleviating micronutrient deficiencies among infants and children. This may be true in industrialized countries, but the same cannot necessarily be said of poor, developing countries. Demonstrates that, even in poor communities, it is possible to combine scant food resources in a cost‐effective way to formulate multimixes which would meet energy, protein and micronutrient needs, without fortification. Proposes that such approaches can be used in community nutrition education programmes to help reduce childhood malnutrition and in emergency feeding programmes.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2000

Keywords: Weaning; Nutrition; Emergency feeding programmes

References