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The role of other orientation in team selection and anticipated performance

The role of other orientation in team selection and anticipated performance Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand how the individual difference of other orientation affects the rational calculation between team input and anticipated performance. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 222 junior and senior level undergraduate business students. Of those students, 176 chose to take a scheduled exam as a team endeavour. Individuals were the unit of analysis in order to determine the individuals' motivation for working in teams. Other orientation was measured using the Comparative Emphasis Scale (CES). Students were asked to report their anticipated exam grade and anticipated total team hours studied. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine the main effects and moderation. Findings – Other orientation moderated the relationship between the decision to take an exam with a teammate and anticipated performance. Other orientation also moderated the relationship between the anticipated amount of effort studying and anticipated performance. In both situations, business students with higher levels of other orientation calculated the rational cost‐benefit relationship less than business students with lower levels of other orientation. Practical implications – The findings will help educators and managers understand the process by which individuals prefer to work in teams and the perceptions of increased performance when working in a team. Originality/value – The study extends the theoretical application of other orientation into the team performance context. The moderating effect of other orientation on the relationship between team input and performance has been studied for the first time and is documented in this paper. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Team Performance Management Emerald Publishing

The role of other orientation in team selection and anticipated performance

Team Performance Management , Volume 18 (1/2): 18 – Mar 2, 2012

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7592
DOI
10.1108/13527591211207707
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand how the individual difference of other orientation affects the rational calculation between team input and anticipated performance. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 222 junior and senior level undergraduate business students. Of those students, 176 chose to take a scheduled exam as a team endeavour. Individuals were the unit of analysis in order to determine the individuals' motivation for working in teams. Other orientation was measured using the Comparative Emphasis Scale (CES). Students were asked to report their anticipated exam grade and anticipated total team hours studied. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine the main effects and moderation. Findings – Other orientation moderated the relationship between the decision to take an exam with a teammate and anticipated performance. Other orientation also moderated the relationship between the anticipated amount of effort studying and anticipated performance. In both situations, business students with higher levels of other orientation calculated the rational cost‐benefit relationship less than business students with lower levels of other orientation. Practical implications – The findings will help educators and managers understand the process by which individuals prefer to work in teams and the perceptions of increased performance when working in a team. Originality/value – The study extends the theoretical application of other orientation into the team performance context. The moderating effect of other orientation on the relationship between team input and performance has been studied for the first time and is documented in this paper.

Journal

Team Performance ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 2, 2012

Keywords: Teams; Team working; Performance management; Decision making; Individual behaviour

References