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The role of business schools in the doctoral paradox

The role of business schools in the doctoral paradox Purpose – To develop an analytical tool that captures the linkages between academic and business innovation. To assess dominant notions of information society, doctoral education and business school as well as their influence on current European focus in terms of R&D policy. Design/methodology/approach – Integration of findings from various streams of research with those of recent European reports. Illustration of R&D policy dilemmas with the case of management development. Findings – Provides an analytical tool which details academic and business innovation activities – the innovation value‐added cycle model. Identifies apparent biases in empirical reports by which R&D incentives may produce other than their intended outcomes (the doctoral paradox). Research limitations/implications – The empirical reports are exclusively European and qualitative. The findings are illustrated with the case of management development only. Practical implications – The analytical tool may support the strategic participation of individuals (researchers and entrepreneurs) as well as communities (universities and locations) in the international innovation division of labour. The three decisional dilemmas in terms of R&D incentives may support decision making of supra‐national, national and local authorities as well as business schools. Originality/value – The paper details the linkages by which academic and business value‐added activities are acknowledged. In addition, it raises awareness on the potential bias of policy‐makers towards positivist knowledge, entrepreneurial researchers and entrepreneurial universities to the detriment of post‐positivist knowledge, researching entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial locations, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Business Review Emerald Publishing

The role of business schools in the doctoral paradox

European Business Review , Volume 20 (2): 14 – Mar 7, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0955-534X
DOI
10.1108/09555340810858252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To develop an analytical tool that captures the linkages between academic and business innovation. To assess dominant notions of information society, doctoral education and business school as well as their influence on current European focus in terms of R&D policy. Design/methodology/approach – Integration of findings from various streams of research with those of recent European reports. Illustration of R&D policy dilemmas with the case of management development. Findings – Provides an analytical tool which details academic and business innovation activities – the innovation value‐added cycle model. Identifies apparent biases in empirical reports by which R&D incentives may produce other than their intended outcomes (the doctoral paradox). Research limitations/implications – The empirical reports are exclusively European and qualitative. The findings are illustrated with the case of management development only. Practical implications – The analytical tool may support the strategic participation of individuals (researchers and entrepreneurs) as well as communities (universities and locations) in the international innovation division of labour. The three decisional dilemmas in terms of R&D incentives may support decision making of supra‐national, national and local authorities as well as business schools. Originality/value – The paper details the linkages by which academic and business value‐added activities are acknowledged. In addition, it raises awareness on the potential bias of policy‐makers towards positivist knowledge, entrepreneurial researchers and entrepreneurial universities to the detriment of post‐positivist knowledge, researching entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial locations, respectively.

Journal

European Business ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 7, 2008

Keywords: Information society; Research and development; Doctorates; Management development; Business schools

References