The reward system of science

The reward system of science AJIM Guest editorial 69,5 At the end of the 1950s, Robert K. Merton (1957, 1973) formalized the idea of a reward system of science. Within the Mertonian framework, the scientific ethos is mainly comprised of four institutional norms: universalism, communism, disinterestedness, and organised scepticism. Its basic precepts are derived from the scientific institution’s main objective, the “extension of certified knowledge” (1973, p. 270). According to Merton (1957), “the institution of science has developed an elaborate system for allocating rewards to those who variously live up to its norms” (p. 642) as they strive to participate in this institutional objective. The notion of recognition can be broadly defined as “the giving of symbolic and material rewards” (Merton, 1973, p. 429) by scientific peers; it is attributed to researchers who contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge through their original work. Recognition therefore lies at the foundation of this reward system and constitutes, in the Mertonian view, both a driving force behind researchers’ actions and the pillar upon which scientific careers are – or at least can be – built. Many decades down the line, the transformations of scholarly communication have led to important modifications in the landscape of scientific recognition, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aslib Journal of Information Management Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2050-3806
D.O.I.
10.1108/AJIM-07-2017-0168
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AJIM Guest editorial 69,5 At the end of the 1950s, Robert K. Merton (1957, 1973) formalized the idea of a reward system of science. Within the Mertonian framework, the scientific ethos is mainly comprised of four institutional norms: universalism, communism, disinterestedness, and organised scepticism. Its basic precepts are derived from the scientific institution’s main objective, the “extension of certified knowledge” (1973, p. 270). According to Merton (1957), “the institution of science has developed an elaborate system for allocating rewards to those who variously live up to its norms” (p. 642) as they strive to participate in this institutional objective. The notion of recognition can be broadly defined as “the giving of symbolic and material rewards” (Merton, 1973, p. 429) by scientific peers; it is attributed to researchers who contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge through their original work. Recognition therefore lies at the foundation of this reward system and constitutes, in the Mertonian view, both a driving force behind researchers’ actions and the pillar upon which scientific careers are – or at least can be – built. Many decades down the line, the transformations of scholarly communication have led to important modifications in the landscape of scientific recognition,

Journal

Aslib Journal of Information ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 18, 2017

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