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The relevance of geographic origin in sustainability challenge: the facets of country ecological image

The relevance of geographic origin in sustainability challenge: the facets of country ecological... Whilst country-of-origin (COO) effects have been studied extensively since the 1960s, little research has explored these effects with respect to ecological considerations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the COO ecological image (CEI) construct by defining its facets across consumers and professionals from two different countries, namely, France and Australia.Design/methodology/approachBecause of the exploratory nature of the research, the authors used two qualitative techniques, namely, semi-structured interviews and focus groups.FindingsFindings indicate the CEI construct is composed of eight dimensions, namely, policy, technological, economic, people characteristics, natural, climatic, historical and eco-product features.Research limitations/implicationsThe research provides insights into the CEI construct and justifies future studies to develop a scale measure for it. However, the generalisability of the results must be considered limited due to the qualitative exploratory nature of the study.Practical implicationsThe research offers implications for companies and policymakers by allowing them to understand how consumers form a CEI. It suggests new applications respective to how to leverage positive aspects of a CEI and how to mitigate negative ones.Originality/valueThe study extends the literature on COO by identifying the possible dimensions of the CEI construct, thus providing better insights into the little-explored link between COO and sustainable products. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Marketing Emerald Publishing

The relevance of geographic origin in sustainability challenge: the facets of country ecological image

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References (65)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0736-3761
DOI
10.1108/jcm-05-2020-3797
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Whilst country-of-origin (COO) effects have been studied extensively since the 1960s, little research has explored these effects with respect to ecological considerations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the COO ecological image (CEI) construct by defining its facets across consumers and professionals from two different countries, namely, France and Australia.Design/methodology/approachBecause of the exploratory nature of the research, the authors used two qualitative techniques, namely, semi-structured interviews and focus groups.FindingsFindings indicate the CEI construct is composed of eight dimensions, namely, policy, technological, economic, people characteristics, natural, climatic, historical and eco-product features.Research limitations/implicationsThe research provides insights into the CEI construct and justifies future studies to develop a scale measure for it. However, the generalisability of the results must be considered limited due to the qualitative exploratory nature of the study.Practical implicationsThe research offers implications for companies and policymakers by allowing them to understand how consumers form a CEI. It suggests new applications respective to how to leverage positive aspects of a CEI and how to mitigate negative ones.Originality/valueThe study extends the literature on COO by identifying the possible dimensions of the CEI construct, thus providing better insights into the little-explored link between COO and sustainable products.

Journal

Journal of Consumer MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 22, 2021

Keywords: Extrinsic cues; Sustainable consumption; Country ecological image (CEI); Country-of-origin effects; Environmental and social concerns

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