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The psychosocial costs of conflict management styles

The psychosocial costs of conflict management styles Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of interpersonal conflict at work and adopting an integrating/compromising conflict style on workers' psychosocial wellbeing. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 311 employed young adults completed an online questionnaire. Findings – Moderated hierarchical multiple regression analyses support the hypothesis that integrating/compromising interacts with interpersonal conflict at work to predict psychosocial strain. Specifically, it was found that integrating/compromising is related to psychosocial strain in a U‐shaped fashion when work conflict is high. Although a moderate degree of integrating/compromising is psychosocially beneficial for workers and can buffer the negative impact of work conflict, beyond a certain point, integrating/compromising is associated with an increase in psychosocial strain when work conflict is high. Research limitations/implications – The results of the study suggest that investigations of conflict styles should focus not only on managing the occurrence of conflict – or resolving it when it does occur – but also on the psychosocial costs of adopting particular conflict styles. The data are cross‐sectional; therefore, inferences about causality are limited. Originality/value – The study is one of the few to empirically test the psychosocial costs of adopting particular conflict styles. In addition, compared with similar studies, more complex relationships (i.e. nonlinear) between the variables are assessed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Conflict Management Emerald Publishing

The psychosocial costs of conflict management styles

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1044-4068
DOI
10.1108/10444061011079930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of interpersonal conflict at work and adopting an integrating/compromising conflict style on workers' psychosocial wellbeing. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 311 employed young adults completed an online questionnaire. Findings – Moderated hierarchical multiple regression analyses support the hypothesis that integrating/compromising interacts with interpersonal conflict at work to predict psychosocial strain. Specifically, it was found that integrating/compromising is related to psychosocial strain in a U‐shaped fashion when work conflict is high. Although a moderate degree of integrating/compromising is psychosocially beneficial for workers and can buffer the negative impact of work conflict, beyond a certain point, integrating/compromising is associated with an increase in psychosocial strain when work conflict is high. Research limitations/implications – The results of the study suggest that investigations of conflict styles should focus not only on managing the occurrence of conflict – or resolving it when it does occur – but also on the psychosocial costs of adopting particular conflict styles. The data are cross‐sectional; therefore, inferences about causality are limited. Originality/value – The study is one of the few to empirically test the psychosocial costs of adopting particular conflict styles. In addition, compared with similar studies, more complex relationships (i.e. nonlinear) between the variables are assessed.

Journal

International Journal of Conflict ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 5, 2010

Keywords: Conflict management; Stress

References

  • Self‐other agreement: does it really matter?
    Atwater, L.E.; Ostroff, C.; Yammarino, F.J.; Fleenor, J.W.
  • Relationships of work stressors with aggression, withdrawal, theft and substance use: an exploratory study
    Chen, P.; Spector, P.
  • A programmatic approach to studying the industrial environment and mental health
    French, J.R.P.; Kahn, R.L.
  • A confirmatory factor analysis of the General Health Questionnaire‐12
    Kalliath, T.J.; O'Driscoll, M.P.; Brough, P.
  • Do conflict management styles affect group decision making? Evidence from a longitudinal field study
    Kuhn, T.; Poole, M.
  • What about negotiator styles?
    Ogilvie, J.R.; Kidder, D.K.
  • Marital communication in eating disorder patients: a controlled observational study
    van den Broucke, S.

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