THE PAPER SHORTAGE

THE PAPER SHORTAGE April, 1942 AIRCRAFT E N G I N E E R I N G 91 One word more—it should be borne in mind by critics that ad-: vertisers are also human and tha t it is extremely galling for them to Aircraft Engineering be told, perhaps month after month, that it is impossible for them to be accommodated in the journal they honour by selecting it for Devoted to the Science and Practice of Aero­ their announcements. There is, therefore, strong pressure very nautics and to Allied and Subsidiary- naturally brought to bear on those who edit and manage a journal to stretch a point and incorporate " just one more page " in any Branches of th e Engineering Industry given issue ; and it is often extremely unpleasant to have'to refuse. Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. There are so many aspects of this paper question, and different methods of economizing, that it is impossible to deal with all ; but Vol. XIV, No. 158 April 1942 there is one other that may be mentioned. It would be possible to print AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING on a smaller size of page. The existing size of page was decided upon fourteen years ago because we. felt that no smaller size would be satisfactory for the type of EADERS will not fail to be struck by the attenuated size article we intended to publish ; having particular regard to mathe­ of this issue ; though they will, we hope, be equally quick matical formulae and the legibility and informability of diagrams to notice that the cutting down has been done at the expense and photographs of technical subjects. We still hold very strongly of the advertisement rather than the editorial pages. The reason to this opinion, and intend to maintain the present size as long as it is, of course, acute shortage of paper resulting from fresh and is possible to do so. We feel, however, justified in pointing out that drastic restrictions that have recently been' put into force. These this in itself affects the advertisement position—for a single reason. necessitate something serious being done, and after much anxious By Government regulation, the number of advertisement pages is in consideration of various alternatives—including that of omitting one the case of any periodical now limited to a definite ration in propor­ issue and publishing a combined April/May issue—we decided that tion to the number of editorial pages. A reduction in page size, and we should best be carrying out what we conceive to be our duty to therefore type area, has the effect—advantageous or otherwise our readers by maintaining continuity of our editorial contents at according to the point of view of the beholder—of automatically the expense of advertisement matter ; since without the former increasing this quota, because the same amount of editorial matter there would be no " vehicle " for the latter. We hope to return to will be spread over more pages and therefore more advertisement more normal conditions in May—though the number of advertise­ pages can be added without exceeding the permitted ratio. We. do ment pages will from now on be considerably fewer than hitherto. not intend to adopt this course, preferring to put the interests of our We are afraid that it will also be necessary in future to use a readers first. much thinner and inferior quality of paper ; which will inevitably The most prominent, as well as the saddest, part of the National mean that the standard of the reproduction of photographs will war effort at the present time is the constant, ceaseless, carping be less satisfactory, so that they will be less informative technic­ ally than hitherto. criticism of how " the other fellow " is doing his job ; particularly if it interferes with the speaker's own particular limited field of This seems a suitable opportunity for explaining in some detail activity. What is needed, and what we are pleading for in this what our policy has been in regard to advertisements. We are domestic explanation, is more co-operation, goodwill and under­ fully aware that many of our technical readers have been extremely standing. critical of what they consider to be the excessive number of pages of advertisements we have been publishing; which, they argue, ill accords with the shortage of paper that is said to exist. In the THE NEW LIGHTING first place we desire to point out to these critics, if they do not already know it, that no technical journal such as AIRCRAFT Having seen frequent references to a mysterious new typ e of light ENGINEERING—or for tha t matter, with a few specialized exceptions, called "fluorescent lamps"-without being able to obtain any details any other paper—can exist without advertisements. Let those, of it, we were some months ago impelled to investigate the matter therefore, who blithely say that the Government should ban for ourselves. After some preliminary inquiries, which revealed all newspaper advertising realize that by so doing they are the minimum of technical information but were sufficient to induce advocating the immediate suppression of all newspapers and period­ in us a belief, so lacking in adequate' foundation as almost to come icals. We are not discussing whether this would be a good or a bad within the definition of intuition, that this new system was a real thing for the community j we are merely pointing out that it would advance on anything previously available, we were instrumental in be the inevitable result of such a policy. When faced with this fact, having one lamp experimentally installed in a small workshop. So our critics tell us that we, a t any rate, ought to publish very many satisfactory was this found to be tha t a further number were at once fewer advertisements, and they usually proceed to pick out isolated ordered before we ourselves had had an opportunity of examining- instances of firms who, they say, have " no right " to be advertising the effect. We still continued our inquiries into the properties and in war-time.as they have nothing to sell—or, for some other, to them, qualities of fluorescent lighting, without very much success until we equally cogent reason. Our first reply to this type of argument is obtained a copy of MR. JENKINS'S admirably informative explana­ statistical. In the past twelve months, two of our contemporaries tory lecture before the ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS which we publish have published in the one case over two, and in the other over three,, in summarized form in this issue. Even in the abbreviated form in pages of advertisements for every one tha t has appeared in AIRCRAFT which, for reasons of space, it appears here, this gives all the informa­ ENGINEERING ; their ratio of editorial to advertisement pages having tion that the prospective user needs for forming an opinion on the been, respectively, in the order of 1 :2. 5 and 1 : 3 while ours has merits of fluorescent lighting; while the photographs we have selected been 1 : 1.09. We claim, therefore, that we cannot fairly be to illustrate it demonstrate the effect. We strongly advise any singled out for obloquy in this respect ; particularly in view of the firm which has not yet had experience of it to take the first oppor­ fact that our figures are due to our having been for eighteen months tunity of visiting a factory where it is used because we are con­ arbitrarily limiting the number of our advertisement pages in an vinced it is the most important advance in lighting that has been endeavour voluntarily to cut down our consumption of paper in made since electric lighting was first introduced. It may be found the national interest. Secondly, we say that it is putting an that there is still a certain amount of prejudice against it from the intolerable and unjustifiable responsibility on any individual more old-fashioned type of architect and, possibly, lighting engin­ to ask him to say that the advertisements of this or that firm should eer, but too much attention should not be paid to this. In practice, be refused. If such action is to be taken it should be taken by for instance, the lamps have a life and quality of lumen maintenance the Government and not be an invidious burden laid upon an at least equal to the tentative figure of 2,000 hours mentioned, individual editor who cannot possibly know the facts in regard to and not, apparently, noticeably inferior to that of the ordinary individual firms or classes of product. All, we maintain, tha t can be electric bulb. done is to accept and publish advertisements in strict rotation up to Readers may like to know that the lecture appears in full in the the limit of the number of pages available, and then close—which is issue of the The Journal of the Royal Society of Arts for April the policy we have consistently adopted. 3rd, 1942. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

THE PAPER SHORTAGE

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 14 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1942

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030888
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

April, 1942 AIRCRAFT E N G I N E E R I N G 91 One word more—it should be borne in mind by critics that ad-: vertisers are also human and tha t it is extremely galling for them to Aircraft Engineering be told, perhaps month after month, that it is impossible for them to be accommodated in the journal they honour by selecting it for Devoted to the Science and Practice of Aero­ their announcements. There is, therefore, strong pressure very nautics and to Allied and Subsidiary- naturally brought to bear on those who edit and manage a journal to stretch a point and incorporate " just one more page " in any Branches of th e Engineering Industry given issue ; and it is often extremely unpleasant to have'to refuse. Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. There are so many aspects of this paper question, and different methods of economizing, that it is impossible to deal with all ; but Vol. XIV, No. 158 April 1942 there is one other that may be mentioned. It would be possible to print AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING on a smaller size of page. The existing size of page was decided upon fourteen years ago because we. felt that no smaller size would be satisfactory for the type of EADERS will not fail to be struck by the attenuated size article we intended to publish ; having particular regard to mathe­ of this issue ; though they will, we hope, be equally quick matical formulae and the legibility and informability of diagrams to notice that the cutting down has been done at the expense and photographs of technical subjects. We still hold very strongly of the advertisement rather than the editorial pages. The reason to this opinion, and intend to maintain the present size as long as it is, of course, acute shortage of paper resulting from fresh and is possible to do so. We feel, however, justified in pointing out that drastic restrictions that have recently been' put into force. These this in itself affects the advertisement position—for a single reason. necessitate something serious being done, and after much anxious By Government regulation, the number of advertisement pages is in consideration of various alternatives—including that of omitting one the case of any periodical now limited to a definite ration in propor­ issue and publishing a combined April/May issue—we decided that tion to the number of editorial pages. A reduction in page size, and we should best be carrying out what we conceive to be our duty to therefore type area, has the effect—advantageous or otherwise our readers by maintaining continuity of our editorial contents at according to the point of view of the beholder—of automatically the expense of advertisement matter ; since without the former increasing this quota, because the same amount of editorial matter there would be no " vehicle " for the latter. We hope to return to will be spread over more pages and therefore more advertisement more normal conditions in May—though the number of advertise­ pages can be added without exceeding the permitted ratio. We. do ment pages will from now on be considerably fewer than hitherto. not intend to adopt this course, preferring to put the interests of our We are afraid that it will also be necessary in future to use a readers first. much thinner and inferior quality of paper ; which will inevitably The most prominent, as well as the saddest, part of the National mean that the standard of the reproduction of photographs will war effort at the present time is the constant, ceaseless, carping be less satisfactory, so that they will be less informative technic­ ally than hitherto. criticism of how " the other fellow " is doing his job ; particularly if it interferes with the speaker's own particular limited field of This seems a suitable opportunity for explaining in some detail activity. What is needed, and what we are pleading for in this what our policy has been in regard to advertisements. We are domestic explanation, is more co-operation, goodwill and under­ fully aware that many of our technical readers have been extremely standing. critical of what they consider to be the excessive number of pages of advertisements we have been publishing; which, they argue, ill accords with the shortage of paper that is said to exist. In the THE NEW LIGHTING first place we desire to point out to these critics, if they do not already know it, that no technical journal such as AIRCRAFT Having seen frequent references to a mysterious new typ e of light ENGINEERING—or for tha t matter, with a few specialized exceptions, called "fluorescent lamps"-without being able to obtain any details any other paper—can exist without advertisements. Let those, of it, we were some months ago impelled to investigate the matter therefore, who blithely say that the Government should ban for ourselves. After some preliminary inquiries, which revealed all newspaper advertising realize that by so doing they are the minimum of technical information but were sufficient to induce advocating the immediate suppression of all newspapers and period­ in us a belief, so lacking in adequate' foundation as almost to come icals. We are not discussing whether this would be a good or a bad within the definition of intuition, that this new system was a real thing for the community j we are merely pointing out that it would advance on anything previously available, we were instrumental in be the inevitable result of such a policy. When faced with this fact, having one lamp experimentally installed in a small workshop. So our critics tell us that we, a t any rate, ought to publish very many satisfactory was this found to be tha t a further number were at once fewer advertisements, and they usually proceed to pick out isolated ordered before we ourselves had had an opportunity of examining- instances of firms who, they say, have " no right " to be advertising the effect. We still continued our inquiries into the properties and in war-time.as they have nothing to sell—or, for some other, to them, qualities of fluorescent lighting, without very much success until we equally cogent reason. Our first reply to this type of argument is obtained a copy of MR. JENKINS'S admirably informative explana­ statistical. In the past twelve months, two of our contemporaries tory lecture before the ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS which we publish have published in the one case over two, and in the other over three,, in summarized form in this issue. Even in the abbreviated form in pages of advertisements for every one tha t has appeared in AIRCRAFT which, for reasons of space, it appears here, this gives all the informa­ ENGINEERING ; their ratio of editorial to advertisement pages having tion that the prospective user needs for forming an opinion on the been, respectively, in the order of 1 :2. 5 and 1 : 3 while ours has merits of fluorescent lighting; while the photographs we have selected been 1 : 1.09. We claim, therefore, that we cannot fairly be to illustrate it demonstrate the effect. We strongly advise any singled out for obloquy in this respect ; particularly in view of the firm which has not yet had experience of it to take the first oppor­ fact that our figures are due to our having been for eighteen months tunity of visiting a factory where it is used because we are con­ arbitrarily limiting the number of our advertisement pages in an vinced it is the most important advance in lighting that has been endeavour voluntarily to cut down our consumption of paper in made since electric lighting was first introduced. It may be found the national interest. Secondly, we say that it is putting an that there is still a certain amount of prejudice against it from the intolerable and unjustifiable responsibility on any individual more old-fashioned type of architect and, possibly, lighting engin­ to ask him to say that the advertisements of this or that firm should eer, but too much attention should not be paid to this. In practice, be refused. If such action is to be taken it should be taken by for instance, the lamps have a life and quality of lumen maintenance the Government and not be an invidious burden laid upon an at least equal to the tentative figure of 2,000 hours mentioned, individual editor who cannot possibly know the facts in regard to and not, apparently, noticeably inferior to that of the ordinary individual firms or classes of product. All, we maintain, tha t can be electric bulb. done is to accept and publish advertisements in strict rotation up to Readers may like to know that the lecture appears in full in the the limit of the number of pages available, and then close—which is issue of the The Journal of the Royal Society of Arts for April the policy we have consistently adopted. 3rd, 1942.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1942

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