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The Open Tube

The Open Tube WE define as an open tube a thinwalled structure, the crosssection of which does not include any closed circuit. This property is common, for example, to the curved channel, the interspar wing cutout and the panel stiffened with Zsections, illustrated in FIG. 1 a, b, c. But the interspar cutout with nose cell FIG. 1d is not an open tube in the present definition. All structures discussed in this paper are assumed to be cylindrical and to have a constant crosssection. It is relatively simple to extend the results to conical taper and longitudinally varying thickness, but this would be beyond the scope and space of the present analysis see, however, ref. 5. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032410
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WE define as an open tube a thinwalled structure, the crosssection of which does not include any closed circuit. This property is common, for example, to the curved channel, the interspar wing cutout and the panel stiffened with Zsections, illustrated in FIG. 1 a, b, c. But the interspar cutout with nose cell FIG. 1d is not an open tube in the present definition. All structures discussed in this paper are assumed to be cylindrical and to have a constant crosssection. It is relatively simple to extend the results to conical taper and longitudinally varying thickness, but this would be beyond the scope and space of the present analysis see, however, ref. 5.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1954

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