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THE NEED FOR PLANNED RESEARCH

THE NEED FOR PLANNED RESEARCH November, 1940 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 321 production of fewer, but better, aeroplanes. An example of the contrary is the Arado system of fuselage construction, originally Aircraft Engineering described in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING a year ago and recalled this month, which is an example of sound thought on right lines in evolving a method essentially suited to large-scale production and yet adaptable for a well-designed fuselage on lines modern, not only at the time it was originally produced, but at the present day—and even we venture to say for some time to come. We Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, F.R.Ae.S., M.S.A.E., F.I.Ae.S. shall be surprised if this system (or adaptions of it) is not to be found in other designs before very long. This series of articles on jig design and construction is in itself an example of th e planning we advocate. Over a period of months, amounting now to years, we have been publishing article after article describing the manner in which the problem of series pro­ F we were asked the essential requisite for British aeroplane duction has been tackled by different firms all over the world and design to retain its commanding lead over the two enemy we have long had in mind the preparation of this series recalling countries, we would reply, "Research; more research and details of the various methods and bringing them together side then still more research." In so doing we should in this instance by side so that designers and production engineers may study and be using the word "research" in its widest and most commonly examine them as a composite picture. The groundwork had, how­ adopted sense to cover not only both long-scale and ad hoc research ever, first to be prepared in the publication of the descriptions of proper, but also experimentation and what is usually referred to individual practice, with all their personal predilections and in Service circles as "development." By which we mean that it idiosyncrasies. is not enough merely to advance by day-to-day improvements on existing practice. It is necessary that vision should be used and Models for Stressing future developments, as far as possible, foreseen and planned. The The article in this issue on the use of models shows how time tendency in times of war stress is undoubtedly to live for the and expense can be saved by their employment, not only in the moment and adopt the attitude that "there is no time now " for familiar manner on aerodynamic matters but in studying the more this or that activity which involves thought. The "ge t it done" mechanical problems of strength and stiffness. It is the greatest and "we want it NOW " attitude can be overdone and is one of help to those in the stress department if, concurrently with their the dangers of the tendency in war time for bringing in men famed mathematical analyses, a series of, as it were, visual experiments for their "drive." This quality is all very well if it is used with can be carried out by which their assumptions and conclusions restraint and directed into the right channels, but it is capable of can be checked and corrected. If this is left to the full-scale stage becoming in fact a clog on real progress. It usually involves a of the completed aeroplane it is obviously much more costly and certain impatience of mind and desire to "see results," which are the results may, in fact, be too late for use to be made of them by no means always compatible with the achievement of the best and corrections incorporated in the particular type of machine under quickly. An immediate step can so often be merely a step side­ test. At best, it may involve modifications in the existing machine ways and not a step upwards and forwards on a carefully flagged and, at worst, the postponement of the application of the informa­ line of advance. tion gained to a future type which may not yet be even on the drawing board. MR. TAYLOR lays down the laws of similitude Exempli Gratia which must be observed and which, if followed, permit of the use For those who care to study it, and will make the time for doing of models to answer at an early stage some of the questions asked so, this issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING bristles with lessons of the stressing staff. Even if, owing to the various assumptions emphasizing the importance of the foregoing reflections; which and allowances that have to be made these may not always be have been engendered by the gradual accumulation, selection and completely accurate and reliable they can at any rate serve as putting together of its contents over the month. If we may be a useful guide and check upon calculation at each stage before permitted to give this paper as an example, the contents of any further analysis is made. At the risk of becoming importunate, particular issue do not just happen. We are constantly planning we would point out that this is further confirmation of the main future issues ahead; selecting an article for use, but perhaps theme on which we have been writing. putting it on one side for a month or two until we can obtain In all the stages of the evolution of an aeroplane those concerned another which will serve in some sort as an introduction to it by should be backed by research and planning. This applies just as generalizing on a matter on which it particularizes. Similarly, much to those engaged on production as to the design staff. each issue is thought out where possible a month or two ahead, There is great need for research into various methods of production, so that it will not contain a surfeit on one aspect of aviation but not only in respect to their merits relatively to each other but also will have articles covering a variety of subjects, to ensure that to their effects on the fundamentals of design. there will be at least one each month to interest each of the wide variety of readers we number among our subscribers. AN APOLOGY In the same way, we urge upon those directing the destinies of We are afraid that readers have had to wait an unduly aeroplane design—and production—not necessarily to adopt a long time for their copies of some recent issues of AIRCRAFT suggestion merely because it is a "good idea," but to see how it ENGINEERING. Apart from the direct effects of enemy action, fits in with the plans for the future which are, or should be, already which particularly affected the September issue, the extra strain laid down. put upon everyone, whether individual or corporation, by the Contrasts in Foresight stress of war leads to delays which inevitably tend to upset working to schedule. Owing to the claims of military service, An instance of what may be described as misdirected energy staffs are depleted and firms of all types are short-handed; is to be found in the drawings from Junkers patents reproduced individuals are constantly working against time and striving to in this month's article of the series entitled "Th e Jigging of Modern avoid falling behind. We are making every possible effort to get Airframes." It is noteworthy that so long ago as 1933 the Junkers AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING out as nearly as possible to the proper firm were designing jigs for a mass production which was at that date each month, but we ask readers to be indulgent in under­ time a possibility hardly visible on the horizon; and on their fore­ standing our difficulties and not to suppose that because any sight they are, of course, to be complimented. On the other hand, particular issue is late in reaching them, or their newsagents, it the exceedingly poor quality of the Junkers Ju. 87 and 88 aero­ will not be coming. There may from time to time be delay, planes shows how their design and performance have suffered from but we will allow nothing to prevent the appearance of each this obsession for mass production. They undoubtedly, as events month's issue in due course. have proved, would have been wiser to have prepared for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

THE NEED FOR PLANNED RESEARCH

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 12 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1940

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030709
Publisher site
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Abstract

November, 1940 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 321 production of fewer, but better, aeroplanes. An example of the contrary is the Arado system of fuselage construction, originally Aircraft Engineering described in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING a year ago and recalled this month, which is an example of sound thought on right lines in evolving a method essentially suited to large-scale production and yet adaptable for a well-designed fuselage on lines modern, not only at the time it was originally produced, but at the present day—and even we venture to say for some time to come. We Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, F.R.Ae.S., M.S.A.E., F.I.Ae.S. shall be surprised if this system (or adaptions of it) is not to be found in other designs before very long. This series of articles on jig design and construction is in itself an example of th e planning we advocate. Over a period of months, amounting now to years, we have been publishing article after article describing the manner in which the problem of series pro­ F we were asked the essential requisite for British aeroplane duction has been tackled by different firms all over the world and design to retain its commanding lead over the two enemy we have long had in mind the preparation of this series recalling countries, we would reply, "Research; more research and details of the various methods and bringing them together side then still more research." In so doing we should in this instance by side so that designers and production engineers may study and be using the word "research" in its widest and most commonly examine them as a composite picture. The groundwork had, how­ adopted sense to cover not only both long-scale and ad hoc research ever, first to be prepared in the publication of the descriptions of proper, but also experimentation and what is usually referred to individual practice, with all their personal predilections and in Service circles as "development." By which we mean that it idiosyncrasies. is not enough merely to advance by day-to-day improvements on existing practice. It is necessary that vision should be used and Models for Stressing future developments, as far as possible, foreseen and planned. The The article in this issue on the use of models shows how time tendency in times of war stress is undoubtedly to live for the and expense can be saved by their employment, not only in the moment and adopt the attitude that "there is no time now " for familiar manner on aerodynamic matters but in studying the more this or that activity which involves thought. The "ge t it done" mechanical problems of strength and stiffness. It is the greatest and "we want it NOW " attitude can be overdone and is one of help to those in the stress department if, concurrently with their the dangers of the tendency in war time for bringing in men famed mathematical analyses, a series of, as it were, visual experiments for their "drive." This quality is all very well if it is used with can be carried out by which their assumptions and conclusions restraint and directed into the right channels, but it is capable of can be checked and corrected. If this is left to the full-scale stage becoming in fact a clog on real progress. It usually involves a of the completed aeroplane it is obviously much more costly and certain impatience of mind and desire to "see results," which are the results may, in fact, be too late for use to be made of them by no means always compatible with the achievement of the best and corrections incorporated in the particular type of machine under quickly. An immediate step can so often be merely a step side­ test. At best, it may involve modifications in the existing machine ways and not a step upwards and forwards on a carefully flagged and, at worst, the postponement of the application of the informa­ line of advance. tion gained to a future type which may not yet be even on the drawing board. MR. TAYLOR lays down the laws of similitude Exempli Gratia which must be observed and which, if followed, permit of the use For those who care to study it, and will make the time for doing of models to answer at an early stage some of the questions asked so, this issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING bristles with lessons of the stressing staff. Even if, owing to the various assumptions emphasizing the importance of the foregoing reflections; which and allowances that have to be made these may not always be have been engendered by the gradual accumulation, selection and completely accurate and reliable they can at any rate serve as putting together of its contents over the month. If we may be a useful guide and check upon calculation at each stage before permitted to give this paper as an example, the contents of any further analysis is made. At the risk of becoming importunate, particular issue do not just happen. We are constantly planning we would point out that this is further confirmation of the main future issues ahead; selecting an article for use, but perhaps theme on which we have been writing. putting it on one side for a month or two until we can obtain In all the stages of the evolution of an aeroplane those concerned another which will serve in some sort as an introduction to it by should be backed by research and planning. This applies just as generalizing on a matter on which it particularizes. Similarly, much to those engaged on production as to the design staff. each issue is thought out where possible a month or two ahead, There is great need for research into various methods of production, so that it will not contain a surfeit on one aspect of aviation but not only in respect to their merits relatively to each other but also will have articles covering a variety of subjects, to ensure that to their effects on the fundamentals of design. there will be at least one each month to interest each of the wide variety of readers we number among our subscribers. AN APOLOGY In the same way, we urge upon those directing the destinies of We are afraid that readers have had to wait an unduly aeroplane design—and production—not necessarily to adopt a long time for their copies of some recent issues of AIRCRAFT suggestion merely because it is a "good idea," but to see how it ENGINEERING. Apart from the direct effects of enemy action, fits in with the plans for the future which are, or should be, already which particularly affected the September issue, the extra strain laid down. put upon everyone, whether individual or corporation, by the Contrasts in Foresight stress of war leads to delays which inevitably tend to upset working to schedule. Owing to the claims of military service, An instance of what may be described as misdirected energy staffs are depleted and firms of all types are short-handed; is to be found in the drawings from Junkers patents reproduced individuals are constantly working against time and striving to in this month's article of the series entitled "Th e Jigging of Modern avoid falling behind. We are making every possible effort to get Airframes." It is noteworthy that so long ago as 1933 the Junkers AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING out as nearly as possible to the proper firm were designing jigs for a mass production which was at that date each month, but we ask readers to be indulgent in under­ time a possibility hardly visible on the horizon; and on their fore­ standing our difficulties and not to suppose that because any sight they are, of course, to be complimented. On the other hand, particular issue is late in reaching them, or their newsagents, it the exceedingly poor quality of the Junkers Ju. 87 and 88 aero­ will not be coming. There may from time to time be delay, planes shows how their design and performance have suffered from but we will allow nothing to prevent the appearance of each this obsession for mass production. They undoubtedly, as events month's issue in due course. have proved, would have been wiser to have prepared for the

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1940

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