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THE NEED FOR ENLIGHTENMENT

THE NEED FOR ENLIGHTENMENT October, 1942 A I R C R A F T ENGINEERIN G 275 A Suggested Cure Aircraft Engineering Even so, there is an obvious and simple way of getting over this difficulty and circulating even the most confidential information. Devote d t o th e Science an d Practice of Aero ­ There is no reason that wc can see, save inertia, why a confidential nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary bulletin should not be produced for circulation in the industry. It would, in our opinion, be well worth while for each firm to Branche s of th e Engineering Industry nominate, or engage, one man to do nothing but collect information on new methods found advantageous in the drawing office and Editor:Lieut.-Col. W.Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S shops, to be sent to a small central editorial staff, who would sift it, put it into shape if necessary, and produce an information bulletin Vol. XIV, No . 164 October 1942 to be distributed free among the junior personnel of all firms in the industry—with the emphasis on the "junior." Why such a scheme THE NEED FOR ENLIGHTENMENT has not long since been put into operation passes our comprehension. AVING been somewhat critical last month of certain aspects of American publicity, we are glad to have an excuse to make Another Suggestion amends for this by drawing attention to the beneficence of the A bulletin of this nature would cover the national effort. There trans-Atlantic readiness to publish and make available to others the remains the dissemination of knowledge on enemy practice. Here fruits of their experience. There is an all-too-common feeling in again, we have since the war, as our readers are well aware, done British industrial circles that anyone who puts pen to paper and everything we can to help by publishing countless translations of writes down his knowledge is wasting his time and not " pulling his articles that have appeared in the German press—some of which weight." This used to be accompanied in many quarters by a. have, we believe, been of considerable value. We have also made firm tendency to treat as the confidential property of each individual a point of making room to publish in full the Ministry of Aircraft company the experience of its own employees. This attitude has, Production reports on captured German machines. But there are we believe, to a very large extent been overcome by the War and a hundred and one details of the design and production of this and there is a welcome willingness in industry to help newcomers, and that part in these machines which ought to be brought to the even' quondam rivals, by a pooling of knowledge. notice of those dealing with similar parts for British aeroplanes— even if only as "horrible examples" of what to avoid. There is, in Removing the Blinkers our opinion, only one way in which this could be satisfactorily accomplished; by organizing an exhibition of captured enemy There still, however, remains a deep-rooted suspicion of putting machines on th e lines of tha t held at the Agricultural Hall, Islington, anything on paper and the suggestion of the further step of print during the war of 1914-18. We arc not suggesting that this should is greeted with the utmost horror. How, otherwise, knowledge can be open to the public—it should be for the benefit of the junior be circulated among the junior staffs, who, after all, have to do the staffs and workmen of the Industry. Some of the more interesting detail work, we cannot imagine. These men, and their older features, at any rate where there were duplicates, could be cut in colleagues who have come into the industry from other activities, half so as to be visible in section. We believe that such an exhibi­ are not privileged to pay visits to other firms but remain confined tion would be of incalculable value to thousands of workers in to the limits of their own office, shop or at the widest, factory. and for the British aircraft industry at the present time and if no one were admitted except with a pass issued by his firm the amount The Privileged Few of supervision necessary would be infinitesimal. I t is only the senior men who get about and have opportunities of meeting and exchanging experience with others. They may, Exempli Gratiae and no doubt frequently do, pass on much of the information to those under them when they get back ; but they are far more likely We have perhaps wandered rather far from our original brief, to become immersed again in their own jobs and lock up the know­ which was to call attention to the remarkably interesting and ledge gained in their own heads. When they have brought to their stimulating paper by MR. F. R. SHANLEY on " Elastic Theory in notice a method of designing or making a part which is notably Sheet-Forming Problems," the first instalment of which appears in inferior to what someone else is doing in the same line, they may, this issue. This is reprinted here by courtesy of the INSTITUTE OF if they remember, produce out of the recesses of their minds the THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES and the Author, to whom we feel the fresh knowledge. In that case, however, time and effort has been grateful thanks of all concerned with metal-forming arc due for wasted because the work simply has to be done all over again. We allowing it to be thus brought to the notice of English readers outside do the best we can in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING by publishing all the the members of the Institute. We cannot conceive of anyone technical information that reaches us, but we have to rely on what charged with the design or production of sheet-metal parts who will is submitted to us, for two reasons ; firstly, because in these days of not derive benefit from reading it. The fact that MR. SHANLEY shortage, or complete lack, of editorial staff it is utterly impossible has found time to write it, and the LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT COR­ to get around and see what is going on and, secondly, because any PORATION agreed to its public presentation, is the best argument that requests for a specially-written article on a development of which we we can think of to support what we have written above. MR . have knowledge is almost invariably met with a rebuff. The SHANLEY has, of course, a world-wide reputation, and is already usual story is tha t nobody has time to write. This, we maintain, is known to our readers, in particular, for his two papers on a grossly mistaken view. " Engineering Aspects of Buckling" and " Gust-load Factor Principles " which wc have previously published. Such papers as this new one of his on sheet-forming problems and MR. J . E. A Matter of Proportion THOMPSON'S series on " Designing for Machinability" (which If, by the occupation of a few hours in writing, information of in reprint form we have been instrumental in bringing widely to the value to the industry as a whole can be put into a form in which it notice of the engineering industry in the past year) are shining can be brought to the notice of, and circulated among, the in­ examples of the type of intelligent, informative summary of know­ dividuals in the industry who are really doing the job, and not ledge for which we are pleading. We only regret that we seem in­ merely supervising it, then that time is extremely well spent and variably to have to look to the other side of the Atlantic for them. worth while—measured by any yardstick. We are aware, of course, that there are some things that should not be printed in the public press ; though there is infinitely more, of the type which we The fact that goods made of raw materials la short supply owing to war conditions are advertised in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should not be taken as an indication that they are have in mind, which cannot by any stretch of imagination be necessarily available for export. described as " secret." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

THE NEED FOR ENLIGHTENMENT

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 14 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1942

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030946
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

October, 1942 A I R C R A F T ENGINEERIN G 275 A Suggested Cure Aircraft Engineering Even so, there is an obvious and simple way of getting over this difficulty and circulating even the most confidential information. Devote d t o th e Science an d Practice of Aero ­ There is no reason that wc can see, save inertia, why a confidential nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary bulletin should not be produced for circulation in the industry. It would, in our opinion, be well worth while for each firm to Branche s of th e Engineering Industry nominate, or engage, one man to do nothing but collect information on new methods found advantageous in the drawing office and Editor:Lieut.-Col. W.Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S shops, to be sent to a small central editorial staff, who would sift it, put it into shape if necessary, and produce an information bulletin Vol. XIV, No . 164 October 1942 to be distributed free among the junior personnel of all firms in the industry—with the emphasis on the "junior." Why such a scheme THE NEED FOR ENLIGHTENMENT has not long since been put into operation passes our comprehension. AVING been somewhat critical last month of certain aspects of American publicity, we are glad to have an excuse to make Another Suggestion amends for this by drawing attention to the beneficence of the A bulletin of this nature would cover the national effort. There trans-Atlantic readiness to publish and make available to others the remains the dissemination of knowledge on enemy practice. Here fruits of their experience. There is an all-too-common feeling in again, we have since the war, as our readers are well aware, done British industrial circles that anyone who puts pen to paper and everything we can to help by publishing countless translations of writes down his knowledge is wasting his time and not " pulling his articles that have appeared in the German press—some of which weight." This used to be accompanied in many quarters by a. have, we believe, been of considerable value. We have also made firm tendency to treat as the confidential property of each individual a point of making room to publish in full the Ministry of Aircraft company the experience of its own employees. This attitude has, Production reports on captured German machines. But there are we believe, to a very large extent been overcome by the War and a hundred and one details of the design and production of this and there is a welcome willingness in industry to help newcomers, and that part in these machines which ought to be brought to the even' quondam rivals, by a pooling of knowledge. notice of those dealing with similar parts for British aeroplanes— even if only as "horrible examples" of what to avoid. There is, in Removing the Blinkers our opinion, only one way in which this could be satisfactorily accomplished; by organizing an exhibition of captured enemy There still, however, remains a deep-rooted suspicion of putting machines on th e lines of tha t held at the Agricultural Hall, Islington, anything on paper and the suggestion of the further step of print during the war of 1914-18. We arc not suggesting that this should is greeted with the utmost horror. How, otherwise, knowledge can be open to the public—it should be for the benefit of the junior be circulated among the junior staffs, who, after all, have to do the staffs and workmen of the Industry. Some of the more interesting detail work, we cannot imagine. These men, and their older features, at any rate where there were duplicates, could be cut in colleagues who have come into the industry from other activities, half so as to be visible in section. We believe that such an exhibi­ are not privileged to pay visits to other firms but remain confined tion would be of incalculable value to thousands of workers in to the limits of their own office, shop or at the widest, factory. and for the British aircraft industry at the present time and if no one were admitted except with a pass issued by his firm the amount The Privileged Few of supervision necessary would be infinitesimal. I t is only the senior men who get about and have opportunities of meeting and exchanging experience with others. They may, Exempli Gratiae and no doubt frequently do, pass on much of the information to those under them when they get back ; but they are far more likely We have perhaps wandered rather far from our original brief, to become immersed again in their own jobs and lock up the know­ which was to call attention to the remarkably interesting and ledge gained in their own heads. When they have brought to their stimulating paper by MR. F. R. SHANLEY on " Elastic Theory in notice a method of designing or making a part which is notably Sheet-Forming Problems," the first instalment of which appears in inferior to what someone else is doing in the same line, they may, this issue. This is reprinted here by courtesy of the INSTITUTE OF if they remember, produce out of the recesses of their minds the THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES and the Author, to whom we feel the fresh knowledge. In that case, however, time and effort has been grateful thanks of all concerned with metal-forming arc due for wasted because the work simply has to be done all over again. We allowing it to be thus brought to the notice of English readers outside do the best we can in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING by publishing all the the members of the Institute. We cannot conceive of anyone technical information that reaches us, but we have to rely on what charged with the design or production of sheet-metal parts who will is submitted to us, for two reasons ; firstly, because in these days of not derive benefit from reading it. The fact that MR. SHANLEY shortage, or complete lack, of editorial staff it is utterly impossible has found time to write it, and the LOCKHEED AIRCRAFT COR­ to get around and see what is going on and, secondly, because any PORATION agreed to its public presentation, is the best argument that requests for a specially-written article on a development of which we we can think of to support what we have written above. MR . have knowledge is almost invariably met with a rebuff. The SHANLEY has, of course, a world-wide reputation, and is already usual story is tha t nobody has time to write. This, we maintain, is known to our readers, in particular, for his two papers on a grossly mistaken view. " Engineering Aspects of Buckling" and " Gust-load Factor Principles " which wc have previously published. Such papers as this new one of his on sheet-forming problems and MR. J . E. A Matter of Proportion THOMPSON'S series on " Designing for Machinability" (which If, by the occupation of a few hours in writing, information of in reprint form we have been instrumental in bringing widely to the value to the industry as a whole can be put into a form in which it notice of the engineering industry in the past year) are shining can be brought to the notice of, and circulated among, the in­ examples of the type of intelligent, informative summary of know­ dividuals in the industry who are really doing the job, and not ledge for which we are pleading. We only regret that we seem in­ merely supervising it, then that time is extremely well spent and variably to have to look to the other side of the Atlantic for them. worth while—measured by any yardstick. We are aware, of course, that there are some things that should not be printed in the public press ; though there is infinitely more, of the type which we The fact that goods made of raw materials la short supply owing to war conditions are advertised in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should not be taken as an indication that they are have in mind, which cannot by any stretch of imagination be necessarily available for export. described as " secret."

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1942

There are no references for this article.