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The Mechanism of Fretting and the Influence of Temperature

The Mechanism of Fretting and the Influence of Temperature The paper deals in some detail with the fretting wear behaviour of mild steel from room temperature to 600C in an air atmosphere. The general mechanism of fretting for mild steel is discussed both at the lower temperatures and also at higher temperatures where normal oxidative processes become involved in the fretting mechanism. Both surface metallographic observations and surface SEM observations are presented in support of the wear processes involved. It is shown that there is a well defined wear transition temperature occurring in the region of 200C together with the possibility of a second transition temperature occurring between 500 and 600C. Finally, some consideration is given to the activation energy for tribooxidation under fretting conditions and the manner in which the rate controlling factor changes from adhesion to oxidation as the temperature of wear increases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

The Mechanism of Fretting and the Influence of Temperature

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 27 (6): 6 – Jun 1, 1975

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb053099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper deals in some detail with the fretting wear behaviour of mild steel from room temperature to 600C in an air atmosphere. The general mechanism of fretting for mild steel is discussed both at the lower temperatures and also at higher temperatures where normal oxidative processes become involved in the fretting mechanism. Both surface metallographic observations and surface SEM observations are presented in support of the wear processes involved. It is shown that there is a well defined wear transition temperature occurring in the region of 200C together with the possibility of a second transition temperature occurring between 500 and 600C. Finally, some consideration is given to the activation energy for tribooxidation under fretting conditions and the manner in which the rate controlling factor changes from adhesion to oxidation as the temperature of wear increases.

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1975

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