The meanings of colour: preferences among hues

The meanings of colour: preferences among hues Colour preferences have both scientific significance and relevance to manufacturers. Despite claims that these preferences are unsystematic and that saturation and brightness exert more influence on judgements than hue, a substantial body of research suggests that the rank order of preference for hues ‐ blue, red, green, violet, orange, yellow ‐ emerges with some degree of consistency and, in particular, blue is regularly preferred to other hues. Five explanations of this trend are considered: preferences are simply conventional; blue is more neutral and less susceptible to extremes of judgement than other hues; preference for blue is a by‐product of more general principles; blue has largely positive associations; blue has an evolutionary significance. It is proposed that further investigation of the connotations of hues will provide insight into the pattern of colour preferences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

The meanings of colour: preferences among hues

Pigment & Resin Technology, Volume 28 (1): 9 – Feb 1, 1999

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/03699429910252315
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Colour preferences have both scientific significance and relevance to manufacturers. Despite claims that these preferences are unsystematic and that saturation and brightness exert more influence on judgements than hue, a substantial body of research suggests that the rank order of preference for hues ‐ blue, red, green, violet, orange, yellow ‐ emerges with some degree of consistency and, in particular, blue is regularly preferred to other hues. Five explanations of this trend are considered: preferences are simply conventional; blue is more neutral and less susceptible to extremes of judgement than other hues; preference for blue is a by‐product of more general principles; blue has largely positive associations; blue has an evolutionary significance. It is proposed that further investigation of the connotations of hues will provide insight into the pattern of colour preferences.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1999

Keywords: Colour; Psychology

References

  • Dimensions and determinants of judgements of colour samples and a simulated interior space by architects and non‐architects
    Hogg, J.; Goodman, S.; Porter, T.; Mikellides, B.; Preddy, D.E.
  • Color meaning and context: comparisons of semantic ratings of colors on samples and objects
    Taft, C.

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