The logic of economic discourse: beyond Adam Smith and Karl Marx

The logic of economic discourse: beyond Adam Smith and Karl Marx Economic discourse has two interesting properties. It tends to be all‐encompassing and it tends to shape the reality which it sets out to describe. Systems of economic theory can become very powerful and those based on ideas from Adam Smith and Karl Marx are good examples. Each of these has produced serious problems which are difficult to cope with because of their tendency to be rooted in a reality which they have helped to create. What is needed is a logic which is open to constant revisions and which ties closely to human experience and a notion of economics which makes this possible. Suggests a “logic of continuous discourse” and an information‐based economy aimed at maximizing the availability of a range of human experience and minimizing the expenditure of energy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Social Economics Emerald Publishing

The logic of economic discourse: beyond Adam Smith and Karl Marx

International Journal of Social Economics, Volume 24 (10): 24 – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0306-8293
DOI
10.1108/03068299710184877
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Economic discourse has two interesting properties. It tends to be all‐encompassing and it tends to shape the reality which it sets out to describe. Systems of economic theory can become very powerful and those based on ideas from Adam Smith and Karl Marx are good examples. Each of these has produced serious problems which are difficult to cope with because of their tendency to be rooted in a reality which they have helped to create. What is needed is a logic which is open to constant revisions and which ties closely to human experience and a notion of economics which makes this possible. Suggests a “logic of continuous discourse” and an information‐based economy aimed at maximizing the availability of a range of human experience and minimizing the expenditure of energy.

Journal

International Journal of Social EconomicsEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1997

Keywords: Economic theory; Politics

References

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