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The Library World Volume 41 Issue 7

The Library World Volume 41 Issue 7 THIS number of THE LIBRARY WORLD returns to the question of foreign literature in British Libraries. The insistence in recent years upon two foreign languages at least, as a qualification for a librarian, has had some good results but they are Still inadequate in extent. Every librarian must be painfully aware of the handicap we British people suffer in our average inability to converse in any language but our own no other race is quite so restricted. A Swiss, for example, does not ask if we can speak this or that language, but asks, In what language shall we speak togethera vastly different thing. It is not because of any lack of power to learn it is merely our unwillingness or lack of opportunity to do so. Such attitudes are anachronisms today peoples get so much closer every hour, and it must be clear to all who think that one place in a town where a foreigner should be able to ask an intelligent question and receive an answer in his own tongue is the library. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Library World Emerald Publishing

The Library World Volume 41 Issue 7

New Library World , Volume 41 (7): 24 – Feb 1, 1939

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0307-4803
DOI
10.1108/eb009217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THIS number of THE LIBRARY WORLD returns to the question of foreign literature in British Libraries. The insistence in recent years upon two foreign languages at least, as a qualification for a librarian, has had some good results but they are Still inadequate in extent. Every librarian must be painfully aware of the handicap we British people suffer in our average inability to converse in any language but our own no other race is quite so restricted. A Swiss, for example, does not ask if we can speak this or that language, but asks, In what language shall we speak togethera vastly different thing. It is not because of any lack of power to learn it is merely our unwillingness or lack of opportunity to do so. Such attitudes are anachronisms today peoples get so much closer every hour, and it must be clear to all who think that one place in a town where a foreigner should be able to ask an intelligent question and receive an answer in his own tongue is the library.

Journal

New Library WorldEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1939

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