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The Library World Volume 34 Issue 10

The Library World Volume 34 Issue 10 THE programme of the Bournemouth Conference shows variety enough concentrated into its three days of business to satisfy even that Mr. Smith, of Leicester, who made Cheltenham memorable for the cheap press. The main subject appears to be book selection of two kinds, adult and junior. Mr. Callender has been given a difficult task, and it does not appear conceivable that any very practical issue can come of the debate even with Mr. Jast as opener. Bookselection must be the application of a series of definite answers to such questions as What is a good book What is a bad book When may an inferior book prove to be the best for the end in view and so on and that is a matter first for a committee, which may give wellled and lengthy deliberation to the subject it certainly won't come to much in open conference. Much the same must be the case with An Analysis of Child Reading, even if Mr. Osborne leads and Mr. Berwick Sayers follows him. On what enquiry will the analysis be based Who has analysed children's reading in England on any scale that would justify public debate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Library World Emerald Publishing

The Library World Volume 34 Issue 10

New Library World , Volume 34 (10): 25 – Apr 1, 1932

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0307-4803
DOI
10.1108/eb009155
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE programme of the Bournemouth Conference shows variety enough concentrated into its three days of business to satisfy even that Mr. Smith, of Leicester, who made Cheltenham memorable for the cheap press. The main subject appears to be book selection of two kinds, adult and junior. Mr. Callender has been given a difficult task, and it does not appear conceivable that any very practical issue can come of the debate even with Mr. Jast as opener. Bookselection must be the application of a series of definite answers to such questions as What is a good book What is a bad book When may an inferior book prove to be the best for the end in view and so on and that is a matter first for a committee, which may give wellled and lengthy deliberation to the subject it certainly won't come to much in open conference. Much the same must be the case with An Analysis of Child Reading, even if Mr. Osborne leads and Mr. Berwick Sayers follows him. On what enquiry will the analysis be based Who has analysed children's reading in England on any scale that would justify public debate

Journal

New Library WorldEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1932

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