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The Library Shelf

The Library Shelf Within the last two decades great progress has been made in the field of hydrodynamics, both in the theoretical sense as well as the practical. This has been particularly noticeable in the rapid advances made, in aircraft and propeller design, which owes most to the successful application of aerodynamical theory. Not so noticeable, and certainly less obvious, are the results obtained by the application of fluid mechanics in other branches of engineering, as for example, in the design of turbomachinery such as turbines, pumps, compressors and that pumpcumturbine arrangement known as the torque converter and the socalled fluid flywheel. In these latter classes of machinery the more modern theories do not attempt to throw down or displace the older laws, by whose means many successful designs have been accomplished, but on the other hand are direct developments thereof as a result of more intensive study. The most important development of recent years, due to the greater knowledge of fluid mechanics, is adequately illustrated by the amazing progress made in the design and performance of axial compressors. Some thirty years ago, a similar but less spectacular application of fluid mechanics was devised in the form of the Michel or Kingsbury thrust bearing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031636
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Within the last two decades great progress has been made in the field of hydrodynamics, both in the theoretical sense as well as the practical. This has been particularly noticeable in the rapid advances made, in aircraft and propeller design, which owes most to the successful application of aerodynamical theory. Not so noticeable, and certainly less obvious, are the results obtained by the application of fluid mechanics in other branches of engineering, as for example, in the design of turbomachinery such as turbines, pumps, compressors and that pumpcumturbine arrangement known as the torque converter and the socalled fluid flywheel. In these latter classes of machinery the more modern theories do not attempt to throw down or displace the older laws, by whose means many successful designs have been accomplished, but on the other hand are direct developments thereof as a result of more intensive study. The most important development of recent years, due to the greater knowledge of fluid mechanics, is adequately illustrated by the amazing progress made in the design and performance of axial compressors. Some thirty years ago, a similar but less spectacular application of fluid mechanics was devised in the form of the Michel or Kingsbury thrust bearing.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1948

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