The Library Shelf

The Library Shelf advantage by university and technical college students whose aeronautical training is mainly concentrated on aerodynamics. It is a pity that in this new edition the opportunity was not taken considerably to shorten the argument on very elementary items, since the reader's interest can­ Niles and Newell on Stressing - Fluid Flow - not but flag when faced by laborious long dis­ cussions. One can only hope that the second An Aeronautical Diary volume, still to be published, will be rewritten completely in a more concise and attractive style and be more in line with the latest developments. The production of the book deserves full praise. Aircraft Structures. Vol. I. Fourth edition. By Chapter VII—Torsion. Elementary data on Bredt- The figures, in particular, are of a very high Alfred S. Niles and Joseph S. Newell. [John Batho theory and warping of single cell tubes, two- standard with clear and uniform lettering—an Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, and Chapman & cell tubes under combined torsion and bending. achievement many of our publishers do not con­ Hall, London, 1954. 62s.] Also some information—without proof—on elastic sider it necessary to strive for. The typographical and plastic instability of tubes under torque, setting is also very clear but one may not like It is a regrettable fact that so few text books on St Venant twisting of open sections (most in­ the founts used; they give a slight impression of aircraft structures exist which can be recom­ adequate) and differential bending. The same a typewritten manuscript. Th e price of 62 shillings mended to students. We in this country have at criticism applies here as under Chapter V. appears reasonable for a book of 600 pages. least the sad excuse that the teaching of aircraft J. II. A. structural theory formed, until a few years ago, a Chapter VIII—Truss Analysis. Analysis of static­ negligible or non-existent part of the curriculum ally determinate pin-jointed frameworks. of University students in Aeronautics. Interest­ Chapter IX—Graphical Methods. Standard tech­ ingly enough, this has never been the policy on Theoretical Hydrodynamics. By L. M. Milne- niques in framework analysis, etc., could really the Continent and in the U.S.A. In fact, a number Thomson. Third edition. [Macmillan. 60s.] have been omitted. of interesting textbooks on aircraft structures have been published in the U.S.A., but it is prob- The third edition of this well-known book is Chapter X—Ties, columns and compression panels. ably fair to state that none has achieved the recog­ essentially the same as the second edition (re­ This chapter is not very satisfactory once the nition awarded to some books on aerodynamics. viewed in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, January 1950), standard Euler case is dealt with. Flexural failure but with a small amount of additional material One of the earliest and still quoted textbooks of panels is treated inadequately and the dis­ included. There is an account of Sir Charles on aircraft stress analysis is the two-volume trea­ cussion of other instability modes rather confused. Darwin's concepts of drift and drift-mass in a tise of Professors A. S. Niles and J. S. Newell on The author does not seem to have consulted the fluid, leading to an interpretation of virtual mass. Aircraft Structures. It first appeared in 1929 and latest literature on the subject. M. Shiffman's principle of reflection across free saw its third edition in 1943. No w the first volume streamlines has also been included, and the is reissued in its fourth edition and it is sad to Chapter XI—Buckling effects in beams. A useful method has been applied to a number of record that one of its originators, J. S. Newell— chapter summarizing Kuhn's analysis of incom­ problems. well known as an educator at M.I.T.—did not plete tension fields. There follows some discus­ The author has made several minor changes live to sec its publication. Naturally, one's anti­ sion on the influence of the post-buckling effec­ and has included some brief extensions of theories cipation of the new volume was considerable tive width of the skin in fuselage stressing. given in the second edition. A few additional since one expected a complete revision of the Chapter XII—Combined stresses. Mohr's stress examples have also been included. book to include modern methods. A first perusal and strain circle; theories of failure under com­ seems to justify, at least partially, these hopes. The general character of the book has not been bined stresses. Information on two-dimensional Thus, the new book is much more stressed-skin changed, and it will continue to be useful as a stress-fields should have been given prior to the conscious than its predecessor and provides new mathematical treatise dealing mainly with the analysis of thin-walled tubes. It is odd that the or extended chapters on physical properties of theory of incompressible inviscid fluids. authors have avoided it and merely discuss here materials, methods of analysis of thin-walled w . A. M. Mohr's circles. The exclusion of any fundamental tubes, buckling of panels and analysis of joints, approach is a weakness noticeable in many parts etc. Let us next consider the contents in more of the book. detail. Collins Aero Diary 1956 [Collins. 5s. 9d.] Chapter XIII—Connexions. This chapter should Chapter I—General design requirements dis­ It is a debatable point whether a diary is the be helpful to the student for it analyses not only cusses mainly steady flight conditions and gives place to publish a condensed textbook on the discontinuous connexions (rivets and spotwelds) some information on gust loads, regrettably various aspects of aeronautics, but if the point be but also continuous ones (adhesive cements). enough without discussion. Landing conditions conceded it can be said that this diary does the and flutter are merely touched upon. Unfortun­ Chapter XIV—Deflexions, dummy-unit-load jo b as well as could be expected in so small a ately this first chapter shows clearly the tendency, method. space. noticeable throughout the book, of giving exces­ There is a good section on applied aero­ Chapter XV—Introduction to statically indeter­ sively lengthy explanations on most elementary dynamics, with examples of different aerofoil minate structures. points and merely outlining more important sections, together with the effects of various types aspects. of flaps, and a very lucid exposition of the changes It is gratifying that in these two last chapters the authors analyse the problem of deformations which an aerofoil experiences as it accelerates Chapter II—Reactions, shear and bending moments. of frameworks and related questions by the through the transonic region. Further sections Analysis of external forces in statically determinate (dummy) unit load method. So many students deal with propellers, performance, the helicopter beams. Sound, but again much too wordy for an are presented with not much more than a blind and gliding. Then there is the structural side, the intelligent student. assessment of loads and the standard methods of application of Castigliano's theorems that the analysis for simple structures. Properties of Chapter III—Beam deflexions. The authors are authors' approach must be commended. One various sections are tabulated and there are to be commended here for giving due prominence could have wished, however, for a clearer exposi­ sections on fatigue, creep and the use of strain to the method of elastic loads (Mohr) and the re­ tion and more rigorous derivation of the unit load method. gauges. The technical section concludes with a lated method of moment areas. Many courses table of logarithms. concentrate often on the dull Macauley proce­ The above summary will indicate that the vol­ dure which is not as instructive as Mohr's ume broadly covers the material one may expect The small size of type necessary for a diary has approach. to find in an introductory course on Aircraft made very difficult the presentation of mathe­ Structures. It must be emphasized, however, that matical expressions, and these are often clumsily Chapter IV—Continuous and restrained beams. A one must not always seek in this book modern arranged. It might have been better to have had sound introduction to three moment equations concise methods and a continuous logical thread. the matter set in larger type and then reduced on and Hardy Cross moment distribution technique. As mentioned previously the lack of these attri­ to a block. Moreover a rather large number of butes is particularly noticeable in the discussions errors and misprints appears. A section of photo­ Chapter V—Properties of materials. A useful on bending and torsion of thin-walled tubes and graphs of modern British aircraft is included, but survey. buckling of panels—in fact, in subjects primarily this is really on a different level from the rest of connected with stressed skin structures. In the re­ the text. Chapter VI—Simple Bending introduces the stu­ viewer's opinion the latter failing makes it suit­ dent to engineers' theory of bending, shear flows, As a diary it has all that one expects, but is able only as an occasional reference book for shear centre, asymmetrical bending, tapered beams inevitably a little large and heavy for the pocket. university students in aeronautics whose course and three flange D-sections. This chapter could However, many people, particularly students, will provides a proper instruction in aeronautical have been improved and shortened by a more find in it a useful introduction to the subject at a systematic and modern approach. structures. On the other hand it may be read with commendably modest price. 20 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The Library Shelf

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 28 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1956

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Emerald Publishing
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ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032649
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Abstract

advantage by university and technical college students whose aeronautical training is mainly concentrated on aerodynamics. It is a pity that in this new edition the opportunity was not taken considerably to shorten the argument on very elementary items, since the reader's interest can­ Niles and Newell on Stressing - Fluid Flow - not but flag when faced by laborious long dis­ cussions. One can only hope that the second An Aeronautical Diary volume, still to be published, will be rewritten completely in a more concise and attractive style and be more in line with the latest developments. The production of the book deserves full praise. Aircraft Structures. Vol. I. Fourth edition. By Chapter VII—Torsion. Elementary data on Bredt- The figures, in particular, are of a very high Alfred S. Niles and Joseph S. Newell. [John Batho theory and warping of single cell tubes, two- standard with clear and uniform lettering—an Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, and Chapman & cell tubes under combined torsion and bending. achievement many of our publishers do not con­ Hall, London, 1954. 62s.] Also some information—without proof—on elastic sider it necessary to strive for. The typographical and plastic instability of tubes under torque, setting is also very clear but one may not like It is a regrettable fact that so few text books on St Venant twisting of open sections (most in­ the founts used; they give a slight impression of aircraft structures exist which can be recom­ adequate) and differential bending. The same a typewritten manuscript. Th e price of 62 shillings mended to students. We in this country have at criticism applies here as under Chapter V. appears reasonable for a book of 600 pages. least the sad excuse that the teaching of aircraft J. II. A. structural theory formed, until a few years ago, a Chapter VIII—Truss Analysis. Analysis of static­ negligible or non-existent part of the curriculum ally determinate pin-jointed frameworks. of University students in Aeronautics. Interest­ Chapter IX—Graphical Methods. Standard tech­ ingly enough, this has never been the policy on Theoretical Hydrodynamics. By L. M. Milne- niques in framework analysis, etc., could really the Continent and in the U.S.A. In fact, a number Thomson. Third edition. [Macmillan. 60s.] have been omitted. of interesting textbooks on aircraft structures have been published in the U.S.A., but it is prob- The third edition of this well-known book is Chapter X—Ties, columns and compression panels. ably fair to state that none has achieved the recog­ essentially the same as the second edition (re­ This chapter is not very satisfactory once the nition awarded to some books on aerodynamics. viewed in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, January 1950), standard Euler case is dealt with. Flexural failure but with a small amount of additional material One of the earliest and still quoted textbooks of panels is treated inadequately and the dis­ included. There is an account of Sir Charles on aircraft stress analysis is the two-volume trea­ cussion of other instability modes rather confused. Darwin's concepts of drift and drift-mass in a tise of Professors A. S. Niles and J. S. Newell on The author does not seem to have consulted the fluid, leading to an interpretation of virtual mass. Aircraft Structures. It first appeared in 1929 and latest literature on the subject. M. Shiffman's principle of reflection across free saw its third edition in 1943. No w the first volume streamlines has also been included, and the is reissued in its fourth edition and it is sad to Chapter XI—Buckling effects in beams. A useful method has been applied to a number of record that one of its originators, J. S. Newell— chapter summarizing Kuhn's analysis of incom­ problems. well known as an educator at M.I.T.—did not plete tension fields. There follows some discus­ The author has made several minor changes live to sec its publication. Naturally, one's anti­ sion on the influence of the post-buckling effec­ and has included some brief extensions of theories cipation of the new volume was considerable tive width of the skin in fuselage stressing. given in the second edition. A few additional since one expected a complete revision of the Chapter XII—Combined stresses. Mohr's stress examples have also been included. book to include modern methods. A first perusal and strain circle; theories of failure under com­ seems to justify, at least partially, these hopes. The general character of the book has not been bined stresses. Information on two-dimensional Thus, the new book is much more stressed-skin changed, and it will continue to be useful as a stress-fields should have been given prior to the conscious than its predecessor and provides new mathematical treatise dealing mainly with the analysis of thin-walled tubes. It is odd that the or extended chapters on physical properties of theory of incompressible inviscid fluids. authors have avoided it and merely discuss here materials, methods of analysis of thin-walled w . A. M. Mohr's circles. The exclusion of any fundamental tubes, buckling of panels and analysis of joints, approach is a weakness noticeable in many parts etc. Let us next consider the contents in more of the book. detail. Collins Aero Diary 1956 [Collins. 5s. 9d.] Chapter XIII—Connexions. This chapter should Chapter I—General design requirements dis­ It is a debatable point whether a diary is the be helpful to the student for it analyses not only cusses mainly steady flight conditions and gives place to publish a condensed textbook on the discontinuous connexions (rivets and spotwelds) some information on gust loads, regrettably various aspects of aeronautics, but if the point be but also continuous ones (adhesive cements). enough without discussion. Landing conditions conceded it can be said that this diary does the and flutter are merely touched upon. Unfortun­ Chapter XIV—Deflexions, dummy-unit-load jo b as well as could be expected in so small a ately this first chapter shows clearly the tendency, method. space. noticeable throughout the book, of giving exces­ There is a good section on applied aero­ Chapter XV—Introduction to statically indeter­ sively lengthy explanations on most elementary dynamics, with examples of different aerofoil minate structures. points and merely outlining more important sections, together with the effects of various types aspects. of flaps, and a very lucid exposition of the changes It is gratifying that in these two last chapters the authors analyse the problem of deformations which an aerofoil experiences as it accelerates Chapter II—Reactions, shear and bending moments. of frameworks and related questions by the through the transonic region. Further sections Analysis of external forces in statically determinate (dummy) unit load method. So many students deal with propellers, performance, the helicopter beams. Sound, but again much too wordy for an are presented with not much more than a blind and gliding. Then there is the structural side, the intelligent student. assessment of loads and the standard methods of application of Castigliano's theorems that the analysis for simple structures. Properties of Chapter III—Beam deflexions. The authors are authors' approach must be commended. One various sections are tabulated and there are to be commended here for giving due prominence could have wished, however, for a clearer exposi­ sections on fatigue, creep and the use of strain to the method of elastic loads (Mohr) and the re­ tion and more rigorous derivation of the unit load method. gauges. The technical section concludes with a lated method of moment areas. Many courses table of logarithms. concentrate often on the dull Macauley proce­ The above summary will indicate that the vol­ dure which is not as instructive as Mohr's ume broadly covers the material one may expect The small size of type necessary for a diary has approach. to find in an introductory course on Aircraft made very difficult the presentation of mathe­ Structures. It must be emphasized, however, that matical expressions, and these are often clumsily Chapter IV—Continuous and restrained beams. A one must not always seek in this book modern arranged. It might have been better to have had sound introduction to three moment equations concise methods and a continuous logical thread. the matter set in larger type and then reduced on and Hardy Cross moment distribution technique. As mentioned previously the lack of these attri­ to a block. Moreover a rather large number of butes is particularly noticeable in the discussions errors and misprints appears. A section of photo­ Chapter V—Properties of materials. A useful on bending and torsion of thin-walled tubes and graphs of modern British aircraft is included, but survey. buckling of panels—in fact, in subjects primarily this is really on a different level from the rest of connected with stressed skin structures. In the re­ the text. Chapter VI—Simple Bending introduces the stu­ viewer's opinion the latter failing makes it suit­ dent to engineers' theory of bending, shear flows, As a diary it has all that one expects, but is able only as an occasional reference book for shear centre, asymmetrical bending, tapered beams inevitably a little large and heavy for the pocket. university students in aeronautics whose course and three flange D-sections. This chapter could However, many people, particularly students, will provides a proper instruction in aeronautical have been improved and shortened by a more find in it a useful introduction to the subject at a systematic and modern approach. structures. On the other hand it may be read with commendably modest price. 20 Aircraft Engineering

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1956

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