The Library Shelf

The Library Shelf tion characteristics given in a previous edition of the book, and is an improvement. The observer will surely remember the shape of an aircraft better, if he has to work out for himself the points that distinguish it from another type, than Fluid Flow — High-Speed Flow Tables — if he is 'spoon-fed' with all the necessary details. Also these background sections are full of in­ Aircraft Recognition teresting points which, while not important, help to relieve the sometimes stern task of memorizing the strange variety of shapes which flit across the The Essentials of Fluid Dynamics. By L. Prandtl. To sum up, this is a very satisfying book, and pages of this book (for instance, one reader was [Blackie. 35.?.] one which should be on the shelves of all students surprised to learn that twenty-four more Ansons The contributions which Prandtl has made to of fluid mechanics. It is, on the whole, very well were built than Dakotas). And talking of shapes the science of fluid dynamics are so numerous and printed and produced, but the reviewer would (all question of performance apart), how much so important that any work from his pen on this like to protest against the small size of the figures better-looking, as such, are the majority of air­ subject must be keenly anticipated. Moreover, (which could, in his view, be at least twice as large craft designed in this country than their con­ Prandtl has a gift for clear exposition and for in most cases) and against the somewhat in­ tinental or transatlantic counterparts. simplicity of illustrations which stems from his different reproduction of some of the photo­ But that is, to some degree, a matter of per­ deep understanding of the subject. It is a pleasure graphs. sonal taste, and, as some will disagree with it, we to record that, in the main, this book has fulfilled A. R. c. prefer to close with an opinion, on which we feel all that the reviewer anticipated from it. It is true there will be general agreement, namely that this that it bears a number of similarities to his earlier well laid-out and up-to-date little book can be A Selection of Tables for Use in Calculations of works, and inevitably there are certain repeti­ recommended to all amateur and professional Compressible Airflow. Prepared on behalf of the tions. At the same time, the subject in all aspects observers, who will find it most useful. Aeronautical Research Council by the Com­ is brought very fully up to date, particularly in R. M. pressible Flow Tables Panel: L. Rosenhead, the matter of references. W. G. Bickley, C. W. Jones, L. F. Nicholson, The book is by no means overburdened with C. K. Thornhill, R. C. Tomlinson.[Geoffrey mathematics; indeed, the author has been at some Cumberlege, Oxford University Press. 40.?.] pains to avoid this, and accordingly, the treat­ This set of tables has been produced at the re- BOOKS RECEIVED ment of some of the more up to date and highly auest of the Fluid Motion Sub-Committee of the mathematical studies in fluid dynamics is by All books received from Publishers are listed under Aeronautical Research Council, who appointed means of short descriptive passages and references this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear the Panel for the purpose. This was done because to the original literature. In this connexion, a later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes, of the growing need to have readily accessible the nor implies, in any particular instance, further notice. condensed extract from the Author's Preface is numerical results based on existing theory of com­ important. High Temperature Steels and Alloys for Gas Turbines pressible flow. It consists of tabulations of func­ 'This book is a translation of the 1949 edi­ —A Symposium. 395 pp., illustrated.[The Iron and tions occurring in well-established formulae, and Steel Institute, 4 Grosvenor Gardens, S.W.I. 63.v.] tion of my Fiihrer durch die Slromimgslehre. which recur frequently. They are intended as an The German title may, perhaps, be translated Flames in the Sky. P. Clostermann. 200 pages, illus­ aid to design, and for the development of new as "A Guide to the Dynamics of Fluids". It in­ trated.[Chatto & Windus. 12.?. 6d.] theory. dicates that the book is intended to be a guide National Bureau of Standards Annual Report 1951. It is intended,to follow the book of tables with to the reader, to the beginner and the advanced Paper bound, 105 pages, illustrated.[Superintendent another volume containing graphs, which cannot of Documents, Govt. Printing Office, Washington student as well as to the expert in an adjoining readily be reproduced on the same size of page as 25, D.C., U.S.A. 50 cents.] field of research. To achieve this, complex the tables. The tables comprise isentropic flow mathematical analysis has been avoided as far The Surface Spread of Flames on Surfaces Treated with tables, characteristic tables, shock tables, tables as possible, and in general formulae take Nitrocellulose Lacquers. Paper bound. 12 pages, for the reduction of pressure ratios, tables of illustrated.[Fire Protection Association, 84 Queen second place, the principal object being the powers of x and (1—x), and miscellaneous Street, E.C.4. Free.] awakening of clear, intuitive apprehension . . . tables. There is also a list of useful functions of y. the body of the text is divided into parts in Dictionnaire Technique AnKlais-Francaise. 347 pages. The tables are arranged with great clarity, and [Hispano-Suiza, Bois-Colombcs, Seine, France. large type and other parts in small type, and it the presentation is excellent. There can be little Free.] is important at this point to stress the meaning doubt that this volume will fulfil its purpose, and of this distinction. Briefly, the parts in large A Selection of Tables for Use in Calculations of Com­ that it is an essential addition to the libraries of type give an introduction, and the paragraphs pressible Airflow. Prepared on behalf of the Aero­ those concerned with high speed flow. nautical Research Council by the Compressible in small type give more detailed information Flow Tables Panel. 143 pages.[Oxford University for advanced readers and experts .. . the text in Press: 40.?.] small type is addressed to those readers who The Observer's Book of Aircraft. Second Edition. Across the Space Frontier. 147 pp. illustrated.[Sidg- have a mathematical interest and to those who By W. Green and G. Pollinger.[Frederick Warne. wick & Jackson. 21.?.] wish to obtain a deeper insight onto the subject 5s.] of fluid dynamics.' The Industrial Application of Aerodynamic Techniques. This is a useful little book, small enough, both (Notes on Applied Science No. 2.) Paper bound, The book contains only five chapters. The first, in cost and size, for almost all pockets. It gives 37 pp., illustrated[H.M. Stationery Office. 3.?. 6c!.\ on the equilibrium of liquids and gases, gives the three silhouettes and a photograph of 156 air­ Designing by Photoclasticity. R. B. Hcywood. 414 pp., first principles, but in a refreshingly novel idiom. craft, including those which made their bow at illustrated.[Chapman & Hall. 65.?.] The second chapter, on kinematics and dynamics Farnborough last September, with photographs Aircraft Structural Mechanics. F. R. Steinbacher and of frictionless fluids, gives, in addition to the of another 100 less important types. At the begin­ G. Gerard. 246 pp., illustrated.[Pitman. 35.?.] material implied by the title, some interesting dis­ ning there are short sections on the British and cussions of surfaces of discontinuity and illustra­ Jane's AH the World's Aircraft, 1952-53. Compiled American systems of identifying their Service and edited by Leonard Bridgman. 331 pp., illus­ tions from the theory of surface waves. The third machines by letters and numbers, a list of inter­ trated.[Sampson Low, Marston. 84s.] chapter, on the motion of viscous fluids, tur­ national civil aircraft markings.and a description bulence and fluid resistance, contains an almost of the method of classification used in compiling indigestible variety of illustration. It includes, the book. This first distinguishes between pure-jet among many other things, a treatment of the and airscrew-drawn aircraft; these main sections Hele-Shaw experiment, the hydrodynamical are divided into classes such as swept-back or A.R.B. NOTICES theory of bearing lubrication, flow through pipes 'straight' wings, number and position of engines. Notices to Licensed Aircraft Engineers and to Owners and water courses, the resistance of immersed Finally the aircraft are placed in ascending order of Civil Aircraft bodies, the Helmholz-Kirchhoff treatment of re­ of wing-span. This is a logical method which will The Council of the Air Registration Board an­ sistance, aerofoil theory, propellers (including directly help the observer, based for the most part nounces the issue of the undermentioned: marine propellers), water turbines, pumps and as it is on recognition features, though a guess at compressors. Chapter 4 deals with the dynamics Contents List, Issue 15. January I, 1953. the wing-span of an aircraft which may be several of gases and gives as full a treatment of the sub­ miles away should not be part of an observer's Notice No. 2, Issue 9. January 1, 1953. Renewal of ject as is possible in a small compass. The last procedure, as he should base his opinion not on Aircraft Maintenance Engineers' Licences. chapter is called 'Miscellaneous Topics' and has an aircraft's apparent size but on its shape. But all Notice No. 4, Issue 12. January 1, 1953. Propellers four main sub-headings: A. Combined Effects of the main classifications used here will help him Approved for use on Civil Aircraft. More Than One State of Matter, in which topics to acquire that habit. Notice No. 16, Issue 3. January 1, 1953. Government- such as cavitation are discussed; B. Rotating surplus Aircraft Engines, Propellers, Instruments, One feature unusual in this type of book is a Body and Rotating System of Reference; C. Flow Equipment and Spares. paragraph devoted to the development and back­ in Heavy Stratified Fluids; D. Heat Transfer in ground of each of the 156 more important ma­ Notice No. 40, Issue 1. January I, 1953. Carbon Moving Fluids, chines. This takes the place of details of recogni­ Monoxide Contamination in Auster Aircraft. February 1953 55 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Emerald Publishing
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ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032262
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Abstract

tion characteristics given in a previous edition of the book, and is an improvement. The observer will surely remember the shape of an aircraft better, if he has to work out for himself the points that distinguish it from another type, than Fluid Flow — High-Speed Flow Tables — if he is 'spoon-fed' with all the necessary details. Also these background sections are full of in­ Aircraft Recognition teresting points which, while not important, help to relieve the sometimes stern task of memorizing the strange variety of shapes which flit across the The Essentials of Fluid Dynamics. By L. Prandtl. To sum up, this is a very satisfying book, and pages of this book (for instance, one reader was [Blackie. 35.?.] one which should be on the shelves of all students surprised to learn that twenty-four more Ansons The contributions which Prandtl has made to of fluid mechanics. It is, on the whole, very well were built than Dakotas). And talking of shapes the science of fluid dynamics are so numerous and printed and produced, but the reviewer would (all question of performance apart), how much so important that any work from his pen on this like to protest against the small size of the figures better-looking, as such, are the majority of air­ subject must be keenly anticipated. Moreover, (which could, in his view, be at least twice as large craft designed in this country than their con­ Prandtl has a gift for clear exposition and for in most cases) and against the somewhat in­ tinental or transatlantic counterparts. simplicity of illustrations which stems from his different reproduction of some of the photo­ But that is, to some degree, a matter of per­ deep understanding of the subject. It is a pleasure graphs. sonal taste, and, as some will disagree with it, we to record that, in the main, this book has fulfilled A. R. c. prefer to close with an opinion, on which we feel all that the reviewer anticipated from it. It is true there will be general agreement, namely that this that it bears a number of similarities to his earlier well laid-out and up-to-date little book can be A Selection of Tables for Use in Calculations of works, and inevitably there are certain repeti­ recommended to all amateur and professional Compressible Airflow. Prepared on behalf of the tions. At the same time, the subject in all aspects observers, who will find it most useful. Aeronautical Research Council by the Com­ is brought very fully up to date, particularly in R. M. pressible Flow Tables Panel: L. Rosenhead, the matter of references. W. G. Bickley, C. W. Jones, L. F. Nicholson, The book is by no means overburdened with C. K. Thornhill, R. C. Tomlinson.[Geoffrey mathematics; indeed, the author has been at some Cumberlege, Oxford University Press. 40.?.] pains to avoid this, and accordingly, the treat­ This set of tables has been produced at the re- BOOKS RECEIVED ment of some of the more up to date and highly auest of the Fluid Motion Sub-Committee of the mathematical studies in fluid dynamics is by All books received from Publishers are listed under Aeronautical Research Council, who appointed means of short descriptive passages and references this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear the Panel for the purpose. This was done because to the original literature. In this connexion, a later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes, of the growing need to have readily accessible the nor implies, in any particular instance, further notice. condensed extract from the Author's Preface is numerical results based on existing theory of com­ important. High Temperature Steels and Alloys for Gas Turbines pressible flow. It consists of tabulations of func­ 'This book is a translation of the 1949 edi­ —A Symposium. 395 pp., illustrated.[The Iron and tions occurring in well-established formulae, and Steel Institute, 4 Grosvenor Gardens, S.W.I. 63.v.] tion of my Fiihrer durch die Slromimgslehre. which recur frequently. They are intended as an The German title may, perhaps, be translated Flames in the Sky. P. Clostermann. 200 pages, illus­ aid to design, and for the development of new as "A Guide to the Dynamics of Fluids". It in­ trated.[Chatto & Windus. 12.?. 6d.] theory. dicates that the book is intended to be a guide National Bureau of Standards Annual Report 1951. It is intended,to follow the book of tables with to the reader, to the beginner and the advanced Paper bound, 105 pages, illustrated.[Superintendent another volume containing graphs, which cannot of Documents, Govt. Printing Office, Washington student as well as to the expert in an adjoining readily be reproduced on the same size of page as 25, D.C., U.S.A. 50 cents.] field of research. To achieve this, complex the tables. The tables comprise isentropic flow mathematical analysis has been avoided as far The Surface Spread of Flames on Surfaces Treated with tables, characteristic tables, shock tables, tables as possible, and in general formulae take Nitrocellulose Lacquers. Paper bound. 12 pages, for the reduction of pressure ratios, tables of illustrated.[Fire Protection Association, 84 Queen second place, the principal object being the powers of x and (1—x), and miscellaneous Street, E.C.4. Free.] awakening of clear, intuitive apprehension . . . tables. There is also a list of useful functions of y. the body of the text is divided into parts in Dictionnaire Technique AnKlais-Francaise. 347 pages. The tables are arranged with great clarity, and [Hispano-Suiza, Bois-Colombcs, Seine, France. large type and other parts in small type, and it the presentation is excellent. There can be little Free.] is important at this point to stress the meaning doubt that this volume will fulfil its purpose, and of this distinction. Briefly, the parts in large A Selection of Tables for Use in Calculations of Com­ that it is an essential addition to the libraries of type give an introduction, and the paragraphs pressible Airflow. Prepared on behalf of the Aero­ those concerned with high speed flow. nautical Research Council by the Compressible in small type give more detailed information Flow Tables Panel. 143 pages.[Oxford University for advanced readers and experts .. . the text in Press: 40.?.] small type is addressed to those readers who The Observer's Book of Aircraft. Second Edition. Across the Space Frontier. 147 pp. illustrated.[Sidg- have a mathematical interest and to those who By W. Green and G. Pollinger.[Frederick Warne. wick & Jackson. 21.?.] wish to obtain a deeper insight onto the subject 5s.] of fluid dynamics.' The Industrial Application of Aerodynamic Techniques. This is a useful little book, small enough, both (Notes on Applied Science No. 2.) Paper bound, The book contains only five chapters. The first, in cost and size, for almost all pockets. It gives 37 pp., illustrated[H.M. Stationery Office. 3.?. 6c!.\ on the equilibrium of liquids and gases, gives the three silhouettes and a photograph of 156 air­ Designing by Photoclasticity. R. B. Hcywood. 414 pp., first principles, but in a refreshingly novel idiom. craft, including those which made their bow at illustrated.[Chapman & Hall. 65.?.] The second chapter, on kinematics and dynamics Farnborough last September, with photographs Aircraft Structural Mechanics. F. R. Steinbacher and of frictionless fluids, gives, in addition to the of another 100 less important types. At the begin­ G. Gerard. 246 pp., illustrated.[Pitman. 35.?.] material implied by the title, some interesting dis­ ning there are short sections on the British and cussions of surfaces of discontinuity and illustra­ Jane's AH the World's Aircraft, 1952-53. Compiled American systems of identifying their Service and edited by Leonard Bridgman. 331 pp., illus­ tions from the theory of surface waves. The third machines by letters and numbers, a list of inter­ trated.[Sampson Low, Marston. 84s.] chapter, on the motion of viscous fluids, tur­ national civil aircraft markings.and a description bulence and fluid resistance, contains an almost of the method of classification used in compiling indigestible variety of illustration. It includes, the book. This first distinguishes between pure-jet among many other things, a treatment of the and airscrew-drawn aircraft; these main sections Hele-Shaw experiment, the hydrodynamical are divided into classes such as swept-back or A.R.B. NOTICES theory of bearing lubrication, flow through pipes 'straight' wings, number and position of engines. Notices to Licensed Aircraft Engineers and to Owners and water courses, the resistance of immersed Finally the aircraft are placed in ascending order of Civil Aircraft bodies, the Helmholz-Kirchhoff treatment of re­ of wing-span. This is a logical method which will The Council of the Air Registration Board an­ sistance, aerofoil theory, propellers (including directly help the observer, based for the most part nounces the issue of the undermentioned: marine propellers), water turbines, pumps and as it is on recognition features, though a guess at compressors. Chapter 4 deals with the dynamics Contents List, Issue 15. January I, 1953. the wing-span of an aircraft which may be several of gases and gives as full a treatment of the sub­ miles away should not be part of an observer's Notice No. 2, Issue 9. January 1, 1953. Renewal of ject as is possible in a small compass. The last procedure, as he should base his opinion not on Aircraft Maintenance Engineers' Licences. chapter is called 'Miscellaneous Topics' and has an aircraft's apparent size but on its shape. But all Notice No. 4, Issue 12. January 1, 1953. Propellers four main sub-headings: A. Combined Effects of the main classifications used here will help him Approved for use on Civil Aircraft. More Than One State of Matter, in which topics to acquire that habit. Notice No. 16, Issue 3. January 1, 1953. Government- such as cavitation are discussed; B. Rotating surplus Aircraft Engines, Propellers, Instruments, One feature unusual in this type of book is a Body and Rotating System of Reference; C. Flow Equipment and Spares. paragraph devoted to the development and back­ in Heavy Stratified Fluids; D. Heat Transfer in ground of each of the 156 more important ma­ Notice No. 40, Issue 1. January I, 1953. Carbon Moving Fluids, chines. This takes the place of details of recogni­ Monoxide Contamination in Auster Aircraft. February 1953 55

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Published: Feb 1, 1953

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