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The Library Shelf

The Library Shelf it fits conveniently into the pocket, contains much general information and a clear exposition of the principles of aircraft recognition. The up-to-date main section provides silhouettes, two photo­ graphs (well chosen and reproduced) and a short An Outstanding Work on Control description of seventy aircraft, with single photo­ graphs of another hundred. and Stability—Aircraft Identification The aircraft are classified in six groups (with helicopters in a seventh) according to their size and maximum speed, for, 'With the advent of jet The Principles of the Control and Stability of Chapters 3 to 6 expound the general mathe­ aircraft the old classifications by engines or Aircraft. By \V. J . Duncan. (Cambridge Univer­ matical theory of the stability of rigid aircraft structure, etc., arc useless for practical recogni­ and the modern methods of solving differential sity Press. 40.r.) tion purposes, as a machine may have concealed equations of motion and investigating stability. engines or other misleading features.' This may Fro m time t o time there appears in all technical The main features of longitudinal and lateral be true, but an expert such as Mr Gibbs-Smith literature a work of outstanding merit which is stability with fixed and free controls are described should surely have been able to find six simple welcomed enthusiastically by all who are striving and clearly explained. Attention is drawn to the classifications based on unchanging features, e.g. to keep abreast of progress in modern develop­ importance of methods of response calculations, high and low wing, single and multiple fins and ments. In the sphere of aerodynamics Professor and, in particular, the useful idea of 'impulsive rudders, which directly help in identifying the Duncan's master hand has produced a book of admittances', borrowed from electrical theory, is aircraft. As it is, his system is based on two points this class. Since 1911 when Bryan's classic treatise introduced in expounding the principle of super­ which are not constant and have little bearing on on 'Stability in Aviation' appeared, there has been position of the effects of a succession of small the shape of the aeroplane as it appears to the no major work devoted solely to stability and impulses to build up the effect of any disturbance observer. The apparent size depends on its height, control. It has been possible in the intervening in general. More advanced methods of dealing and it may be moving at any speed up to its maxi­ years to cover the known field of this subject in with stability and response based on experience mum, accurate judgment of this being exceedingly one or two chapters of more general works in with coupled electric circuits have received wide difficult. The system appears arbitrary, useful for aerodynamics. But during and since the late war application in America and are being increasingly merely cataloguing, but of no direct help in knowledge and experience have expanded so applied in this country to the design of servo- recognition. An excellent index overcomes any greatly that a separate volume has become a mechanisms; these are beyond the scope of the difficulty which might arise from the apparently necessity. present work, but references are given for the haphazard placing of the aircraft within their The book by Duncan is the first of a new scries benefit of readers who wish to study these valu­ groups. on aeronautical subjects to be published by Cam­ able methods. Other references are supplied for The descriptions are vivid and helpful, though bridge University Press under the general editor­ the further study of the fundamental theories of tending to be 'chatty' and over-anxious to give ship of Mr E. F. Relf, C.B.E., F.R.S. The stan­ Chapter 4. each type a personality, by the use of adjectives dard aimed at is that of the post-graduate teach­ A brief discussion of the methods and types of like 'slippery' (used eight times), 'pert' and ing at the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield, apparatus employed in the determination of aero­ 'vigorous', in the way of the lesser books on where students are led skilfully to the frontiers at dynamic derivatives is given in Chapter 8. The wine. These pen-portraits sometimes almost re­ which current research workers are active. next chapter is an introduction to the properties semble family jokes, meaningless to an outsider, Material from sources old and new has been care­ of the usual aeroplane controls and to the specific as when the wings of the Meteor N.F. 11 are de­ fully sifted to form the foundations for the teach­ kinds of problem met in their design. scribed as '"fully-fashioned" on the outer panels ing at the College, and these foundations provide Flight at very high speeds has added very with rounded tips'. This jocular style might have matter very suitable for text-books having a wide materially to the complexity of the practical been restrained and thus room provided for more appeal. The study of control and stability is ob­ problems in connexion with control and stabil­ of Mr Charles Sargeant's 'Aero-caricatures' viously of vital importance to all who design and ity. The complexity arises from the consequences which emphasize better then words can the operate aircraft or who are training to do so, and of the distortions of the structure under load and characteristics of the aircraft he draws (there are here at last is a book of manageable proportions several pages of his work before the main sec­ of compressibility of the air. Professor Duncan which will make such a study profitable and tion), and leave the reader to choose his own devotes a chapter to each of these matters. There soundly based with economy of effort. The theory is Chapter 12 on distortion which gives an admir­ epithets and pet names. of stability and control has profited of late years able account of the kind of difficulty which must But this book has undoubtedly been compiled by the parallel researches on flutter, and conse­ be overcome in solving practical problems, and with great care and will be most useful to all who quently it is particularly fitting that its principles the approximate methods which have been de­ are interested in identifying aeroplanes. One pre­ should be expounded by such a well-known vised to render the problems tractable. It is here sumes that, on the various points raised here, Mr pioneer in the investigation of the kindred prob­ especially that the experience gained from the Gibbs-Smith has tested his ideas practically and lems of flutter as Professor Duncan. The exposi­ applications of the theory of flutter has been so tion is admirably clear and interesting, and the found them satisfactory—which is what matters. invaluable. There is also Chapter 13 on compres­ course is well balanced, being neither too simpli­ sibility which is a summary of the known prin­ fied nor too complex. All the important branches ciples of compressible flow applied to control and of the subject are introduced to the reader and BOOKS RECEIVED stability, together with an account of the theory carried to a point where he is well equipped to of the join t influence of distortion and compressi­ continue his studies in the directions most suited All books received from Publishers are listed under bility on static stability. to his needs. In order to deal concisely with the this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes, various basic arguments mathematical symbolism Professor A. D. Young has contributed two nor implies, in any particular instance, further notice. is freely used, but the standard of mathematical excellent chapters, one on stalling and spinning, attainment demanded of the reader is not high— and the other on flaps for take-off and landing. The Surface Area and Volume of Dished Ends. D . E. W. elementary knowledge of algebra, trigonometry Both are well illustrated and omit nothing of Aldous. Paper bound. 23 pp. illustrated.[Emmott and the calculus is, however, presumed. basic importance. The author is an acknowledged & Co. Ltd., 31 King Street West, Manchester, 3. authority on both subjects and his contributions After an introductory survey, very useful to the 25. 6c!.] complete this comprehensive treatment of con­ newcomer, a chapter devoted to the elementary trol and stability. Military Aircraft of the U.S.S.R. C. W. Cain and mechanics of flight deals with typical steady D. J. Voadcn. Paper bound, 72 pages, illustrated. The writer has detected only two or three errors motions and manoeuvres of aircraft, and de­ [Herbert Jenkins. 3s. 6tl.] in the text and figures, whilst the format and letter­ scribes in the simplest terms the principal charac­ press arc the good quality expected of the Cam­ teristics of the disturbed motions; preliminary The Welding of Non-Ferrous Metals. E. G. West. bridge University Press. Some readers may feel a 553 pages, illustrated.[Chapman & Hall. 55s.] ideas concerning stability and the effects of dis­ lack of illustrative examples and figures in some tortions of the structure, the so-called aero- Mechanik. Band HI. Dynamik der Systeme. H. parts of the work, and perhaps in some future elastic effects, are included in this second chapter. Zicglcr. 396 pages, illustrated.[Vcrlag Birkhiiuser, edition the advisability of adding these might be Two other chapters are recommended on the first Basel, Switzerland. Frs. 46.80.] considered by the author. The main feeling of reading by beginners: Chapter 7 on controls, and most interested readers will assuredly be one of Elements de Calcul de Construction Acronautique. Chapter 10 on static stability and manoeuvrabil­ gratitude for such a useful and up-to-date book. P. de Guillcnchmidt. 618 pages, illustrated.[Edi­ ity. Chapter 7 introduces the subject of flap con­ tions Chiron, 40 Rue de Seine, Paris (Vie). No L. w . B. trols treated on the thin aerofoil theory; it also price stated.] gives some introduction to the influence of re­ sponse on control forces, to the principles of aero­ The Air League Recognition Manual. By C. H. The Aeroplane Directory, 1952. 434 pages.[Temple dynamic and mass balancing, and to the influence Gibbs-Smith. [Putnam. 10s. 6d.] Press. 15s.] of viscosity. Chapter 10 is devoted to an account Mr Gibbs-Smith has long been associated with Theory and Practice of Flutter Calculations for Systems of the very important theory of static stability and the intelligent and methodical teaching of aircraft with Many Degrees of Freedom. A. I. van de manoeuvrability based mainly on conceptions due recognition. His new handbook maintains his Voorcn.[Eduard Ijdo N.V., Leiden, Netherlands. to Gates. high standard. It is strongly bound and, although No price stated.] Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The Library Shelf

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 24 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032180
Publisher site
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Abstract

it fits conveniently into the pocket, contains much general information and a clear exposition of the principles of aircraft recognition. The up-to-date main section provides silhouettes, two photo­ graphs (well chosen and reproduced) and a short An Outstanding Work on Control description of seventy aircraft, with single photo­ graphs of another hundred. and Stability—Aircraft Identification The aircraft are classified in six groups (with helicopters in a seventh) according to their size and maximum speed, for, 'With the advent of jet The Principles of the Control and Stability of Chapters 3 to 6 expound the general mathe­ aircraft the old classifications by engines or Aircraft. By \V. J . Duncan. (Cambridge Univer­ matical theory of the stability of rigid aircraft structure, etc., arc useless for practical recogni­ and the modern methods of solving differential sity Press. 40.r.) tion purposes, as a machine may have concealed equations of motion and investigating stability. engines or other misleading features.' This may Fro m time t o time there appears in all technical The main features of longitudinal and lateral be true, but an expert such as Mr Gibbs-Smith literature a work of outstanding merit which is stability with fixed and free controls are described should surely have been able to find six simple welcomed enthusiastically by all who are striving and clearly explained. Attention is drawn to the classifications based on unchanging features, e.g. to keep abreast of progress in modern develop­ importance of methods of response calculations, high and low wing, single and multiple fins and ments. In the sphere of aerodynamics Professor and, in particular, the useful idea of 'impulsive rudders, which directly help in identifying the Duncan's master hand has produced a book of admittances', borrowed from electrical theory, is aircraft. As it is, his system is based on two points this class. Since 1911 when Bryan's classic treatise introduced in expounding the principle of super­ which are not constant and have little bearing on on 'Stability in Aviation' appeared, there has been position of the effects of a succession of small the shape of the aeroplane as it appears to the no major work devoted solely to stability and impulses to build up the effect of any disturbance observer. The apparent size depends on its height, control. It has been possible in the intervening in general. More advanced methods of dealing and it may be moving at any speed up to its maxi­ years to cover the known field of this subject in with stability and response based on experience mum, accurate judgment of this being exceedingly one or two chapters of more general works in with coupled electric circuits have received wide difficult. The system appears arbitrary, useful for aerodynamics. But during and since the late war application in America and are being increasingly merely cataloguing, but of no direct help in knowledge and experience have expanded so applied in this country to the design of servo- recognition. An excellent index overcomes any greatly that a separate volume has become a mechanisms; these are beyond the scope of the difficulty which might arise from the apparently necessity. present work, but references are given for the haphazard placing of the aircraft within their The book by Duncan is the first of a new scries benefit of readers who wish to study these valu­ groups. on aeronautical subjects to be published by Cam­ able methods. Other references are supplied for The descriptions are vivid and helpful, though bridge University Press under the general editor­ the further study of the fundamental theories of tending to be 'chatty' and over-anxious to give ship of Mr E. F. Relf, C.B.E., F.R.S. The stan­ Chapter 4. each type a personality, by the use of adjectives dard aimed at is that of the post-graduate teach­ A brief discussion of the methods and types of like 'slippery' (used eight times), 'pert' and ing at the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield, apparatus employed in the determination of aero­ 'vigorous', in the way of the lesser books on where students are led skilfully to the frontiers at dynamic derivatives is given in Chapter 8. The wine. These pen-portraits sometimes almost re­ which current research workers are active. next chapter is an introduction to the properties semble family jokes, meaningless to an outsider, Material from sources old and new has been care­ of the usual aeroplane controls and to the specific as when the wings of the Meteor N.F. 11 are de­ fully sifted to form the foundations for the teach­ kinds of problem met in their design. scribed as '"fully-fashioned" on the outer panels ing at the College, and these foundations provide Flight at very high speeds has added very with rounded tips'. This jocular style might have matter very suitable for text-books having a wide materially to the complexity of the practical been restrained and thus room provided for more appeal. The study of control and stability is ob­ problems in connexion with control and stabil­ of Mr Charles Sargeant's 'Aero-caricatures' viously of vital importance to all who design and ity. The complexity arises from the consequences which emphasize better then words can the operate aircraft or who are training to do so, and of the distortions of the structure under load and characteristics of the aircraft he draws (there are here at last is a book of manageable proportions several pages of his work before the main sec­ of compressibility of the air. Professor Duncan which will make such a study profitable and tion), and leave the reader to choose his own devotes a chapter to each of these matters. There soundly based with economy of effort. The theory is Chapter 12 on distortion which gives an admir­ epithets and pet names. of stability and control has profited of late years able account of the kind of difficulty which must But this book has undoubtedly been compiled by the parallel researches on flutter, and conse­ be overcome in solving practical problems, and with great care and will be most useful to all who quently it is particularly fitting that its principles the approximate methods which have been de­ are interested in identifying aeroplanes. One pre­ should be expounded by such a well-known vised to render the problems tractable. It is here sumes that, on the various points raised here, Mr pioneer in the investigation of the kindred prob­ especially that the experience gained from the Gibbs-Smith has tested his ideas practically and lems of flutter as Professor Duncan. The exposi­ applications of the theory of flutter has been so tion is admirably clear and interesting, and the found them satisfactory—which is what matters. invaluable. There is also Chapter 13 on compres­ course is well balanced, being neither too simpli­ sibility which is a summary of the known prin­ fied nor too complex. All the important branches ciples of compressible flow applied to control and of the subject are introduced to the reader and BOOKS RECEIVED stability, together with an account of the theory carried to a point where he is well equipped to of the join t influence of distortion and compressi­ continue his studies in the directions most suited All books received from Publishers are listed under bility on static stability. to his needs. In order to deal concisely with the this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes, various basic arguments mathematical symbolism Professor A. D. Young has contributed two nor implies, in any particular instance, further notice. is freely used, but the standard of mathematical excellent chapters, one on stalling and spinning, attainment demanded of the reader is not high— and the other on flaps for take-off and landing. The Surface Area and Volume of Dished Ends. D . E. W. elementary knowledge of algebra, trigonometry Both are well illustrated and omit nothing of Aldous. Paper bound. 23 pp. illustrated.[Emmott and the calculus is, however, presumed. basic importance. The author is an acknowledged & Co. Ltd., 31 King Street West, Manchester, 3. authority on both subjects and his contributions After an introductory survey, very useful to the 25. 6c!.] complete this comprehensive treatment of con­ newcomer, a chapter devoted to the elementary trol and stability. Military Aircraft of the U.S.S.R. C. W. Cain and mechanics of flight deals with typical steady D. J. Voadcn. Paper bound, 72 pages, illustrated. The writer has detected only two or three errors motions and manoeuvres of aircraft, and de­ [Herbert Jenkins. 3s. 6tl.] in the text and figures, whilst the format and letter­ scribes in the simplest terms the principal charac­ press arc the good quality expected of the Cam­ teristics of the disturbed motions; preliminary The Welding of Non-Ferrous Metals. E. G. West. bridge University Press. Some readers may feel a 553 pages, illustrated.[Chapman & Hall. 55s.] ideas concerning stability and the effects of dis­ lack of illustrative examples and figures in some tortions of the structure, the so-called aero- Mechanik. Band HI. Dynamik der Systeme. H. parts of the work, and perhaps in some future elastic effects, are included in this second chapter. Zicglcr. 396 pages, illustrated.[Vcrlag Birkhiiuser, edition the advisability of adding these might be Two other chapters are recommended on the first Basel, Switzerland. Frs. 46.80.] considered by the author. The main feeling of reading by beginners: Chapter 7 on controls, and most interested readers will assuredly be one of Elements de Calcul de Construction Acronautique. Chapter 10 on static stability and manoeuvrabil­ gratitude for such a useful and up-to-date book. P. de Guillcnchmidt. 618 pages, illustrated.[Edi­ ity. Chapter 7 introduces the subject of flap con­ tions Chiron, 40 Rue de Seine, Paris (Vie). No L. w . B. trols treated on the thin aerofoil theory; it also price stated.] gives some introduction to the influence of re­ sponse on control forces, to the principles of aero­ The Air League Recognition Manual. By C. H. The Aeroplane Directory, 1952. 434 pages.[Temple dynamic and mass balancing, and to the influence Gibbs-Smith. [Putnam. 10s. 6d.] Press. 15s.] of viscosity. Chapter 10 is devoted to an account Mr Gibbs-Smith has long been associated with Theory and Practice of Flutter Calculations for Systems of the very important theory of static stability and the intelligent and methodical teaching of aircraft with Many Degrees of Freedom. A. I. van de manoeuvrability based mainly on conceptions due recognition. His new handbook maintains his Voorcn.[Eduard Ijdo N.V., Leiden, Netherlands. to Gates. high standard. It is strongly bound and, although No price stated.] Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1952

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