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The Lear Gyromatic Navigator

The Lear Gyromatic Navigator May, 1941 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 137 A Comprehensive Gyroscopic Navigational Instrument Emanating from the U.S.A. controlled by the gyroscope component in the H E Lear Gyromatic Navigator combines base of the instrument. The miniature refer­ th e separate indications of an automatic ence aeroplane is etched in the glass cover of the Twireless direction finder and a directional instrument, and aids the pilot in visualizing his gyro, relates the results with reference to the navigational problem and its solution. The aircraft's course, and automatically gives the 360 degree scale can be adjusted manually to pilot a continuous running solution of various show bearings off the aeroplane's heading, off navigational problems. the magnetic North, or off the true North. The instrument is claimed to be able to Fig. 2 is a graphic illustration of the progres­ perform the following functions in navigation: sive steps in making an instrument approach (a) Straight-line navigation along any and landing with the Gyromatic Navigator. desired track, either toward or away from a The pilot is shown homing towards a trans­ wireless transmitting station. mitting station located at one end of the run­ (b) Straight-line navigation under un­ way: the "desired track" index has been set known and varying drift conditions, without for the direction of the runway from the trans­ visual references outside the aeroplane. mitting station—in this instance due East. (c) Rapid pin-pointing and straight-line The pilot makes his approach at any safe navigation to any destination not provided altitude and when he passes over the radio with a wireless transmitting station. station, the direction-finding index reverses, (d) Rapid instrument approach and land­ showing that the station is astern. The pilot ing using a single non-directional marker then makes a standard two-minute turn to the located on the prolongation of the desired left and continues that turn until the radio runway. station comes directly abeam. He then flat­ I n addition, it is also claimed that the instru­ tens out his turn and proceeds circling the ment provides all th e indications of an automatic station-seeking wireless direction finder and tha t it functions completely as a directional gyro. Fig. 1 shows the exterior of the instrument The following brief description of a new as arranged for vertical mounting. The gyro­ navigational instrument, which has earned for its inventor the "Frank scopic unit is contained in the base of the body Hawk s Memorial Award" , appears to u s casting. The connexion to the driving shaft to be of particula r interest to ou r British of the automatic wireless direction finder is reader s in view of the maker's claim to be seen near the top of the instrument. tha t "Aside from use in civil aircraft, radio station, always keeping it abeam. This The double-ended pointer, actuated by the these facilities are sufficient to bring a large circle is approximately a four-minute wireless direction finder, automatically points bombe r over enemy objectives, an d per­ tur n in still air ; note that the pilot can circle towards the transmitting station. The double mi t the attacker to drop his bombs the station correctly regardless of wind condi­ throug h clouds or fog" line is the "desired track" index, which is tions merely by keeping his station abeam. etched on a light-weight transparent disc When the pilot reaches the position shown in the third sketch, with the station abeam and the desired track index directly astern, he checks his altitude; if it exceeds 1,000 ft., he continues circling, losing his height at any desired rate, until he arrives in this position a t an altitude of about 1,000 ft. He then flies straight out on a course reciprocal to the desired track index. As the radio station is left astern, the radio index moves aft. When it reaches a bearing of 30 deg., the pilot makes a standard 180 deg. two-minute turn. If this procedure has been followed, the pilot is now a set distance away from the radio station, in a straight line with the runway, as indicated by both his radio and desired track indices, which are now both directly ahead. The pilot loses his altitude down to about 300 ft. and proceeds towards the radio station and the runway, correcting for drift if necessary. As soon as he passes over the radio station, the radio index reverses and the pilot makes his final approach and landing on the desired runway. TRAD E PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED Shelter Ventilation [Vent-Axia Ltd., London] Aluminium Technique, f, p. No. 11, October; No. 12, November, 1940, and No. 13, March, 1941 [Aluminium Union Limited, London] Instruments for the Measurement of High Vacua [W. Edwards & Co. (London) Ltd., London] Bausch & Lomb Improved Brinell Microscope Bausch & Lomb Optical Drill Gauge Bausch & Lomb Toolmakers' Microscope "R-Del" Universal Scissor Gauge The Foster Introscope [A. C. Wickman Ltd., Coventry] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The Lear Gyromatic Navigator

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 13 (5): 1 – May 1, 1941

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030773
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

May, 1941 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 137 A Comprehensive Gyroscopic Navigational Instrument Emanating from the U.S.A. controlled by the gyroscope component in the H E Lear Gyromatic Navigator combines base of the instrument. The miniature refer­ th e separate indications of an automatic ence aeroplane is etched in the glass cover of the Twireless direction finder and a directional instrument, and aids the pilot in visualizing his gyro, relates the results with reference to the navigational problem and its solution. The aircraft's course, and automatically gives the 360 degree scale can be adjusted manually to pilot a continuous running solution of various show bearings off the aeroplane's heading, off navigational problems. the magnetic North, or off the true North. The instrument is claimed to be able to Fig. 2 is a graphic illustration of the progres­ perform the following functions in navigation: sive steps in making an instrument approach (a) Straight-line navigation along any and landing with the Gyromatic Navigator. desired track, either toward or away from a The pilot is shown homing towards a trans­ wireless transmitting station. mitting station located at one end of the run­ (b) Straight-line navigation under un­ way: the "desired track" index has been set known and varying drift conditions, without for the direction of the runway from the trans­ visual references outside the aeroplane. mitting station—in this instance due East. (c) Rapid pin-pointing and straight-line The pilot makes his approach at any safe navigation to any destination not provided altitude and when he passes over the radio with a wireless transmitting station. station, the direction-finding index reverses, (d) Rapid instrument approach and land­ showing that the station is astern. The pilot ing using a single non-directional marker then makes a standard two-minute turn to the located on the prolongation of the desired left and continues that turn until the radio runway. station comes directly abeam. He then flat­ I n addition, it is also claimed that the instru­ tens out his turn and proceeds circling the ment provides all th e indications of an automatic station-seeking wireless direction finder and tha t it functions completely as a directional gyro. Fig. 1 shows the exterior of the instrument The following brief description of a new as arranged for vertical mounting. The gyro­ navigational instrument, which has earned for its inventor the "Frank scopic unit is contained in the base of the body Hawk s Memorial Award" , appears to u s casting. The connexion to the driving shaft to be of particula r interest to ou r British of the automatic wireless direction finder is reader s in view of the maker's claim to be seen near the top of the instrument. tha t "Aside from use in civil aircraft, radio station, always keeping it abeam. This The double-ended pointer, actuated by the these facilities are sufficient to bring a large circle is approximately a four-minute wireless direction finder, automatically points bombe r over enemy objectives, an d per­ tur n in still air ; note that the pilot can circle towards the transmitting station. The double mi t the attacker to drop his bombs the station correctly regardless of wind condi­ throug h clouds or fog" line is the "desired track" index, which is tions merely by keeping his station abeam. etched on a light-weight transparent disc When the pilot reaches the position shown in the third sketch, with the station abeam and the desired track index directly astern, he checks his altitude; if it exceeds 1,000 ft., he continues circling, losing his height at any desired rate, until he arrives in this position a t an altitude of about 1,000 ft. He then flies straight out on a course reciprocal to the desired track index. As the radio station is left astern, the radio index moves aft. When it reaches a bearing of 30 deg., the pilot makes a standard 180 deg. two-minute turn. If this procedure has been followed, the pilot is now a set distance away from the radio station, in a straight line with the runway, as indicated by both his radio and desired track indices, which are now both directly ahead. The pilot loses his altitude down to about 300 ft. and proceeds towards the radio station and the runway, correcting for drift if necessary. As soon as he passes over the radio station, the radio index reverses and the pilot makes his final approach and landing on the desired runway. TRAD E PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED Shelter Ventilation [Vent-Axia Ltd., London] Aluminium Technique, f, p. No. 11, October; No. 12, November, 1940, and No. 13, March, 1941 [Aluminium Union Limited, London] Instruments for the Measurement of High Vacua [W. Edwards & Co. (London) Ltd., London] Bausch & Lomb Improved Brinell Microscope Bausch & Lomb Optical Drill Gauge Bausch & Lomb Toolmakers' Microscope "R-Del" Universal Scissor Gauge The Foster Introscope [A. C. Wickman Ltd., Coventry]

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1941

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