The Latest Boeing

The Latest Boeing 44 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G February, 1935 A Few Notes on the Improved Version of the Boeing 247 Commercial Type T is regretted that in our issue for November while the cruising speed at 12,000 ft. is 1S9 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERISTICS 1934, owing to an error which was not m.p.h. and, at 8,000 ft., 180 m.p.h. It climbs Length .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 51 ft. 4 in. noticed until too late for rectification, from sea level a t the rate of 1,150 ft. a minute Height .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 12 ft. 1¾ in. the scale drawings described as representing and has an absolute ceiling of 27,200 ft. Its Span .. .. .. .. .. .. 74ft. Chord at wing root .. .. .. .. .. ..15 ft. the Boeing 247 type were actually a composite cruising range, without refuelling, at 75 per Chord, mean .. .. .. .. .. .. 144•10 in. illustration of two different machines. The cent horse-power is 800 miles. It has been Wmg area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 836•13 sq. ft. Aileron area .. .. .. .. .. .. 60•8 sq. ft. Boeing Aircraft Company have kindly sent us licensed for a gross weight of 13,650 lb., with Stabilizer area.. .. .. .. .. .. 82•84 sq. ft. the accompanying correct drawings of their a payload of 2,582 lb., including ten passengers, Elevator area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 47•66 sq. ft. Rudder area .. .. .. .. .. .. 27•9 sq. ft. latest type—the Boeing 247-D—which arrived baggage and cargo. Fin area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 17•6 sq.ft. third in the England-Australia race. Weight empty .. .. .. .. .. .. 8,940 lb. The 247-D is equipped with two-geared Useful load .. .. .. .. .. .. 4,710 1b. supercharged 550 h.p. Pratt & Whitney Wasp Productio n Contracts Pilot and crew (2) .. .. .. .. .. 340 lb. Fuel (273 gallons) .. .. .. .. .. 1,6381b. engines and three-bladed Hamilton Standard Ten of the all-metal, low-wing, twin-Wasp Oil (20 gallons) .. .. .. .. .. .. 150 1b. controllable pitch airscrews. On the original Payload .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,582 1b. Boeing 247-D type aeroplanes have been Passenger capacity .. .. .. .. .. .. 10 Model 247's, direct-drive Wasps and two- delivered to United Air Lines to supplement dross weight .. .. .. .. .. .. 13,650 1b. bladed controllable pitch airscrews were Top speed at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 200 m.p.h. the sixty Model 247 transports delivered last provided. Cruising speed at 12,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 189 m.p.h. year and to make possible further reduction in Cruising speed at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 180 m.p.h. coast-to-coast travel time. Three others have Landing speed at sea level .. .. .. .. 62 m.p.h. Initial rate of climb .. .. .. .. .. .. 1.150 f.p.m. been sold to the Deutsche Luft Hansa and one, Improvement s in Performance Kate of climb at 6,600 ft .. .. .. .. .. 1,200 f.p.m. flown by Colonel Roscoe Turner and Clyde Rate of climb at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 1,100 f.p.m. An outstanding feature of the performance Climb in ten minutes from sea level .. .. .. 11,000 ft. Pangborn, was placed among the winners in Take-off run at sea level .. .. .. .. ..925 ft. is an increase of 187 per cent in the single- the London-Melbourne air race. Take-off time at sea level .. .. .. .. 18 seconds engined performance as compared with that Cruising range at 75 per cent h.p .. .. .. .. 800 miles I n tests, the 247-D showed remarkable Cruising range at 62•5 per cent h.p .. .. .. .. 900 miles of the Model 247 ; the ceiling on either of the Service ceiling .. .. .. .. .. .. 25,400 ft. increases in top speed, cruising speed, cruising two engines only is 11,500 ft. compared with Absolute ceiling .. .. .. .. .. .. 27,200 ft. range, ceiling, rate of climb, and single-engine Absolute ceiling on one engine .. .. .. .. 11,500 ft. 4,000 ft. for the earlier type. The Wasps in performance over its predecessor, the Boeing Wing loading .. .. .. .. .. 16•3 1b./sq. ft. the 247-D have a blower gear ratio of 12:1 Power loading .. .. .. .. .. .. 12•4 1b./h.p . Model 247. The maximum speed is 200 m.p.h., and an airscrew gear ratio of 3:2 . Structurally, and in appearance, the 247-D is much the same as the Model 247 except for its larger engine nacelles, its N.C.A. type ring cowls and its sloping windshield. A variety of other changes have been made, however. Not only has performance been improved, but cabin quietness has been materially increased. Factors contributing to the latter include new-type insulation in the cabin and pilots' compartment, elimination of individual ventilators and reduction of airscrew tip noise. A hot-air heating system capable of maintain­ ing a comfortable temperature at all altitudes has been adopted. Also provided is an improved ventilating system by means of which cabin air can be completely changed once every 45 seconds. Ventilating equipment includes two fresh air intakes with ducts which dis­ tribute air along the cabin ceiling and two air outlets at the base of the cabin walls. Improved head rests on the adjustable reclining cabin chairs are another comfort feature. Flush type rivets are used around the leading edge of the wing and stabilizer. The elevator and rudder are of metal construction, fabric covered, rather than of all-metal construction as on the original 247s. The trailing edge flap built into the rudder is of the divided type, with the top half acting as an aerodynamic balance and the lower half serving as a trimming flap. A number of minor improvements also have been made in connection with maintenance and servicing features. MacRobertson Trophy Success I t will be remembered tha t the Boeing 247-D, piloted by Colonel Roscoe Turner and Clyde Pangborn in the MacRobertson Trophy race, landed at Melbourne according to the official timing 3 days, 20 hours, 55 minutes, 38 seconds after leaving Mildenhall. It was the third machine t o arrive bu t was subsequently awarded the second prize in the speed contest owing t o Parmentier and Moll, who actually arrived second in the Douglas, electing to take the first prize in the handicap. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The Latest Boeing

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 7 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1935

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029903
Publisher site
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Abstract

44 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G February, 1935 A Few Notes on the Improved Version of the Boeing 247 Commercial Type T is regretted that in our issue for November while the cruising speed at 12,000 ft. is 1S9 PRINCIPAL CHARACTERISTICS 1934, owing to an error which was not m.p.h. and, at 8,000 ft., 180 m.p.h. It climbs Length .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 51 ft. 4 in. noticed until too late for rectification, from sea level a t the rate of 1,150 ft. a minute Height .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 12 ft. 1¾ in. the scale drawings described as representing and has an absolute ceiling of 27,200 ft. Its Span .. .. .. .. .. .. 74ft. Chord at wing root .. .. .. .. .. ..15 ft. the Boeing 247 type were actually a composite cruising range, without refuelling, at 75 per Chord, mean .. .. .. .. .. .. 144•10 in. illustration of two different machines. The cent horse-power is 800 miles. It has been Wmg area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 836•13 sq. ft. Aileron area .. .. .. .. .. .. 60•8 sq. ft. Boeing Aircraft Company have kindly sent us licensed for a gross weight of 13,650 lb., with Stabilizer area.. .. .. .. .. .. 82•84 sq. ft. the accompanying correct drawings of their a payload of 2,582 lb., including ten passengers, Elevator area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 47•66 sq. ft. Rudder area .. .. .. .. .. .. 27•9 sq. ft. latest type—the Boeing 247-D—which arrived baggage and cargo. Fin area .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 17•6 sq.ft. third in the England-Australia race. Weight empty .. .. .. .. .. .. 8,940 lb. The 247-D is equipped with two-geared Useful load .. .. .. .. .. .. 4,710 1b. supercharged 550 h.p. Pratt & Whitney Wasp Productio n Contracts Pilot and crew (2) .. .. .. .. .. 340 lb. Fuel (273 gallons) .. .. .. .. .. 1,6381b. engines and three-bladed Hamilton Standard Ten of the all-metal, low-wing, twin-Wasp Oil (20 gallons) .. .. .. .. .. .. 150 1b. controllable pitch airscrews. On the original Payload .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,582 1b. Boeing 247-D type aeroplanes have been Passenger capacity .. .. .. .. .. .. 10 Model 247's, direct-drive Wasps and two- delivered to United Air Lines to supplement dross weight .. .. .. .. .. .. 13,650 1b. bladed controllable pitch airscrews were Top speed at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 200 m.p.h. the sixty Model 247 transports delivered last provided. Cruising speed at 12,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 189 m.p.h. year and to make possible further reduction in Cruising speed at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 180 m.p.h. coast-to-coast travel time. Three others have Landing speed at sea level .. .. .. .. 62 m.p.h. Initial rate of climb .. .. .. .. .. .. 1.150 f.p.m. been sold to the Deutsche Luft Hansa and one, Improvement s in Performance Kate of climb at 6,600 ft .. .. .. .. .. 1,200 f.p.m. flown by Colonel Roscoe Turner and Clyde Rate of climb at 8,000 ft .. .. .. .. .. 1,100 f.p.m. An outstanding feature of the performance Climb in ten minutes from sea level .. .. .. 11,000 ft. Pangborn, was placed among the winners in Take-off run at sea level .. .. .. .. ..925 ft. is an increase of 187 per cent in the single- the London-Melbourne air race. Take-off time at sea level .. .. .. .. 18 seconds engined performance as compared with that Cruising range at 75 per cent h.p .. .. .. .. 800 miles I n tests, the 247-D showed remarkable Cruising range at 62•5 per cent h.p .. .. .. .. 900 miles of the Model 247 ; the ceiling on either of the Service ceiling .. .. .. .. .. .. 25,400 ft. increases in top speed, cruising speed, cruising two engines only is 11,500 ft. compared with Absolute ceiling .. .. .. .. .. .. 27,200 ft. range, ceiling, rate of climb, and single-engine Absolute ceiling on one engine .. .. .. .. 11,500 ft. 4,000 ft. for the earlier type. The Wasps in performance over its predecessor, the Boeing Wing loading .. .. .. .. .. 16•3 1b./sq. ft. the 247-D have a blower gear ratio of 12:1 Power loading .. .. .. .. .. .. 12•4 1b./h.p . Model 247. The maximum speed is 200 m.p.h., and an airscrew gear ratio of 3:2 . Structurally, and in appearance, the 247-D is much the same as the Model 247 except for its larger engine nacelles, its N.C.A. type ring cowls and its sloping windshield. A variety of other changes have been made, however. Not only has performance been improved, but cabin quietness has been materially increased. Factors contributing to the latter include new-type insulation in the cabin and pilots' compartment, elimination of individual ventilators and reduction of airscrew tip noise. A hot-air heating system capable of maintain­ ing a comfortable temperature at all altitudes has been adopted. Also provided is an improved ventilating system by means of which cabin air can be completely changed once every 45 seconds. Ventilating equipment includes two fresh air intakes with ducts which dis­ tribute air along the cabin ceiling and two air outlets at the base of the cabin walls. Improved head rests on the adjustable reclining cabin chairs are another comfort feature. Flush type rivets are used around the leading edge of the wing and stabilizer. The elevator and rudder are of metal construction, fabric covered, rather than of all-metal construction as on the original 247s. The trailing edge flap built into the rudder is of the divided type, with the top half acting as an aerodynamic balance and the lower half serving as a trimming flap. A number of minor improvements also have been made in connection with maintenance and servicing features. MacRobertson Trophy Success I t will be remembered tha t the Boeing 247-D, piloted by Colonel Roscoe Turner and Clyde Pangborn in the MacRobertson Trophy race, landed at Melbourne according to the official timing 3 days, 20 hours, 55 minutes, 38 seconds after leaving Mildenhall. It was the third machine t o arrive bu t was subsequently awarded the second prize in the speed contest owing t o Parmentier and Moll, who actually arrived second in the Douglas, electing to take the first prize in the handicap.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1935

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