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The Jigging of Modern Airframes

The Jigging of Modern Airframes The Henschel standard section jig as used for tail surfaces is in its simplest form. Unfortunately no details of its application to other parts have been published, but the Heinkel jigs shown in Figs. 148 and 149 appear to have been built on this principle. This fact is of particular interest as, although the Henschel Flugzeugwerke A.G. had been used as a shadow factory for a number of designs, it had had no published connexion with the Heinkel works at the time 1939 that these photographs were taken. The He 111k fuselage frame jig shown in Fig. 148 has a basic structure of square tubes and gusset plates which closely resembles the Henschel type. The frame, an important sparlocating bulkhead, is held by a profile plate fitted within the basic structure. The second Heinkel jig Fig. 149 is for the nose portion of the He 111k and is undoubtedly designed on similar lines, if the Henschel patents have not actually been used. The uniformed official in the foreground is Dr Ley, the photograph having been taken at a propaganda inspection of the Oranienburg factory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The Jigging of Modern Airframes

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 13 (7): 10 – Jul 1, 1941

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030802
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Henschel standard section jig as used for tail surfaces is in its simplest form. Unfortunately no details of its application to other parts have been published, but the Heinkel jigs shown in Figs. 148 and 149 appear to have been built on this principle. This fact is of particular interest as, although the Henschel Flugzeugwerke A.G. had been used as a shadow factory for a number of designs, it had had no published connexion with the Heinkel works at the time 1939 that these photographs were taken. The He 111k fuselage frame jig shown in Fig. 148 has a basic structure of square tubes and gusset plates which closely resembles the Henschel type. The frame, an important sparlocating bulkhead, is held by a profile plate fitted within the basic structure. The second Heinkel jig Fig. 149 is for the nose portion of the He 111k and is undoubtedly designed on similar lines, if the Henschel patents have not actually been used. The uniformed official in the foreground is Dr Ley, the photograph having been taken at a propaganda inspection of the Oranienburg factory.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1941

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