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The Japanese 5‐S practice and TQM training

The Japanese 5‐S practice and TQM training Workplaces in Japan are well‐known for their cleanliness and orderliness. This results from the Japanese emphasis on training and discipline. The logic behind the 5‐S practice is that organization, neatness, cleanliness, standardization and discipline at the workplace are basic requirements for producing high quality products and services, with little or no waste, while maintaining high levels of productivity. Outlines results of an intensive questionnaire survey on about 3,000 companies in the UK and 200 leading companies in Japan with a response rate of about 12 per cent. Aims to determine whether the Japanese 5‐S practice has a significant contribution to the successful total quality management (TQM) implementation. The main finding from the 205 manufacturing and 106 services firms in the UK as well as 16 leading companies from Japan is that the 5‐S provides an essential total quality environment which is an important base for implementing TQM successfully. Inevitably, TQM training policy should incorporate the 5‐S practice guidelines. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Training for Quality Emerald Publishing

The Japanese 5‐S practice and TQM training

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0968-4875
DOI
10.1108/09684879510098222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Workplaces in Japan are well‐known for their cleanliness and orderliness. This results from the Japanese emphasis on training and discipline. The logic behind the 5‐S practice is that organization, neatness, cleanliness, standardization and discipline at the workplace are basic requirements for producing high quality products and services, with little or no waste, while maintaining high levels of productivity. Outlines results of an intensive questionnaire survey on about 3,000 companies in the UK and 200 leading companies in Japan with a response rate of about 12 per cent. Aims to determine whether the Japanese 5‐S practice has a significant contribution to the successful total quality management (TQM) implementation. The main finding from the 205 manufacturing and 106 services firms in the UK as well as 16 leading companies from Japan is that the 5‐S provides an essential total quality environment which is an important base for implementing TQM successfully. Inevitably, TQM training policy should incorporate the 5‐S practice guidelines.

Journal

Training for QualityEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1995

Keywords: Japanese management styles; TQM; Training

References