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The interdependence between the extended organizational commitment model and the self-determination theory

The interdependence between the extended organizational commitment model and the... The purpose of this paper is to discover the relationship between the extended organizational commitment model (EOCM) and self-determination theory (SDT). The author shows that specific dimensions of commitment can be associated with the forms of regulation and motivation.Design/methodology/approachUsing literature analysis, the author sets the theoretical relationships between commitment and regulation (and motivation). The interrelated relationships are illustrated qualitatively by presenting case studies.FindingsLike the regulation-based motivation scale, the dimensions of organizational commitment (OC) can be sorted and combined with regulation and motivation. The emotional-based OC dimensions (normative commitment as a sense of indebtedness (NC:HiSoI); normative commitment as a moral duty (NC:HiMD); affective commitment (AC)) are influenced by regulation and motivation. In the case of cost-based OC dimensions (deliberate commitment (DC); continuance commitment as a low perceived alternatives (CC:LoAlt); continuance commitment as high sacrifice (CC:HiSac)), the leaders’ motivational strategies are driven by their perceives of the employees’ OC. Commitment dimensions stemming from a degree of necessity are linked to lower levels of regulation, while commitment dimensions stemming from internal conviction are linked to the higher levels of regulation.Research limitations/implicationsThe results also must be proved by quantitative researches later. The model presented in this study primarily supports the theoretical understanding of relationships, so its validity should be tested in different cultures, professions or employees with different qualifications and personalities in the future.Practical implicationsSignificant resources can be saved for an organization if managers do not want to increase OC in general, rather only its one dimension, depending on the situation and goals, or if managers form their employees’ commitment profiles in a smaller team severally. However, in other cases, the employees’ commitment profiles set the useable motivational strategies, which call into question the suitability of universal motivation systems.Social implicationsFrom the point of view of employees, the synergy between regulation (and motivation) and OC contributes to the improvement of their psychological well-being and means more efficient use of resources for organizations.Originality/valueThe study shows the hierarchy of dimensions of the EOCM and its relationship with regulations in the SDT. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Advances in Management Research Emerald Publishing

The interdependence between the extended organizational commitment model and the self-determination theory

Journal of Advances in Management Research , Volume 17 (1): 18 – Jan 14, 2020

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0972-7981
DOI
10.1108/jamr-02-2019-0030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discover the relationship between the extended organizational commitment model (EOCM) and self-determination theory (SDT). The author shows that specific dimensions of commitment can be associated with the forms of regulation and motivation.Design/methodology/approachUsing literature analysis, the author sets the theoretical relationships between commitment and regulation (and motivation). The interrelated relationships are illustrated qualitatively by presenting case studies.FindingsLike the regulation-based motivation scale, the dimensions of organizational commitment (OC) can be sorted and combined with regulation and motivation. The emotional-based OC dimensions (normative commitment as a sense of indebtedness (NC:HiSoI); normative commitment as a moral duty (NC:HiMD); affective commitment (AC)) are influenced by regulation and motivation. In the case of cost-based OC dimensions (deliberate commitment (DC); continuance commitment as a low perceived alternatives (CC:LoAlt); continuance commitment as high sacrifice (CC:HiSac)), the leaders’ motivational strategies are driven by their perceives of the employees’ OC. Commitment dimensions stemming from a degree of necessity are linked to lower levels of regulation, while commitment dimensions stemming from internal conviction are linked to the higher levels of regulation.Research limitations/implicationsThe results also must be proved by quantitative researches later. The model presented in this study primarily supports the theoretical understanding of relationships, so its validity should be tested in different cultures, professions or employees with different qualifications and personalities in the future.Practical implicationsSignificant resources can be saved for an organization if managers do not want to increase OC in general, rather only its one dimension, depending on the situation and goals, or if managers form their employees’ commitment profiles in a smaller team severally. However, in other cases, the employees’ commitment profiles set the useable motivational strategies, which call into question the suitability of universal motivation systems.Social implicationsFrom the point of view of employees, the synergy between regulation (and motivation) and OC contributes to the improvement of their psychological well-being and means more efficient use of resources for organizations.Originality/valueThe study shows the hierarchy of dimensions of the EOCM and its relationship with regulations in the SDT.

Journal

Journal of Advances in Management ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 14, 2020

Keywords: Self-determination theory; Extrinsic motivation; Intrinsic motivation; Regulation; Organizational commitment; Deliberate commitment

References