The influence of family responsibilities, career fields and gender on career success An empirical study

The influence of family responsibilities, career fields and gender on career success An empirical... Purpose – The paper seeks to analyze empirically the consequences of family responsibilities for career success and the influence of career context variables and gender on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach – The sample consists of 305 business school graduates (52 percent male) from a major Central European university who finished their studies around 2000 and who were in their early career stages (i.e. third and fourth career years). Findings – The paper reports a negative relationship between family responsibilities and objective and subjective career success via work centrality. There is also substantive support for the effect of contextual factors on the relationship between family situations and career success, emphasizing the importance of a multi‐level perspective. Finally, evidence of gender effects exists. Research limitations/implications – The empirical generalizability of the results is limited by the structure of the sample. Qualitative in‐depth studies are needed to further understand the relationships found. Practical implications – The results underscore the importance of the work‐family‐interface for employee retention measures. Tailored HR policies are crucial. Originality/value – Theoretically, the paper develops a multi‐level causal model of specific aspects of work‐family relations including variables ranging from meso (career context) to more micro (family, individual). Empirically, the study focuses on young business professionals prior to having a family or in the early stages of their family life. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

The influence of family responsibilities, career fields and gender on career success An empirical study

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
DOI
10.1108/02683940810861392
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The paper seeks to analyze empirically the consequences of family responsibilities for career success and the influence of career context variables and gender on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach – The sample consists of 305 business school graduates (52 percent male) from a major Central European university who finished their studies around 2000 and who were in their early career stages (i.e. third and fourth career years). Findings – The paper reports a negative relationship between family responsibilities and objective and subjective career success via work centrality. There is also substantive support for the effect of contextual factors on the relationship between family situations and career success, emphasizing the importance of a multi‐level perspective. Finally, evidence of gender effects exists. Research limitations/implications – The empirical generalizability of the results is limited by the structure of the sample. Qualitative in‐depth studies are needed to further understand the relationships found. Practical implications – The results underscore the importance of the work‐family‐interface for employee retention measures. Tailored HR policies are crucial. Originality/value – Theoretically, the paper develops a multi‐level causal model of specific aspects of work‐family relations including variables ranging from meso (career context) to more micro (family, individual). Empirically, the study focuses on young business professionals prior to having a family or in the early stages of their family life.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 28, 2008

Keywords: Sociology of work; Family; Careers; Gender

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