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The impact on educational technology of a fatal airline accident: a case study

The impact on educational technology of a fatal airline accident: a case study Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to study of how a virtual technology burden was created that impacted the professional pilot college student and various colleges/universities that offer professional pilot degree programs. A cascading set of events began as a result of US congressional reaction to a tragic airline accident. The resulting legislation forced the Federal Aviation Administration to publish new rules for first officer qualifications that were unmindful of the recommendations of professional pilot groups for simulation-based training. Ultimately, this placed a financial burden on both the college/university training curriculum and on the professional pilot student. Design/methodology/approach– This paper adopts a case study approach. Findings– Because of US congressional over-reaction, a collegiate system which produced excellent first officer candidates who had below 500 flight hours and who had been demonstrated scientifically to be efficient, skilled, and safe, was upended. The flight hour requirements were increased fivefold with little regard to its impact on the pilot pool. Congressional legislation forced the FAA to create and publish new rules that were unmindful of the simulation recommendations of professional pilot groups and required virtual simulation technology new to the college/university training environment. Originality/value– Traces the effect of government interference into a previously stable continuum of college-prepared airline pilots who are safe and effective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology Emerald Publishing

The impact on educational technology of a fatal airline accident: a case study

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4880
DOI
10.1108/IJILT-12-2014-0032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to study of how a virtual technology burden was created that impacted the professional pilot college student and various colleges/universities that offer professional pilot degree programs. A cascading set of events began as a result of US congressional reaction to a tragic airline accident. The resulting legislation forced the Federal Aviation Administration to publish new rules for first officer qualifications that were unmindful of the recommendations of professional pilot groups for simulation-based training. Ultimately, this placed a financial burden on both the college/university training curriculum and on the professional pilot student. Design/methodology/approach– This paper adopts a case study approach. Findings– Because of US congressional over-reaction, a collegiate system which produced excellent first officer candidates who had below 500 flight hours and who had been demonstrated scientifically to be efficient, skilled, and safe, was upended. The flight hour requirements were increased fivefold with little regard to its impact on the pilot pool. Congressional legislation forced the FAA to create and publish new rules that were unmindful of the simulation recommendations of professional pilot groups and required virtual simulation technology new to the college/university training environment. Originality/value– Traces the effect of government interference into a previously stable continuum of college-prepared airline pilots who are safe and effective.

Journal

The International Journal of Information and Learning TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2015

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