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The Good University: what Universities Actually do and why it’s Time for Radical Change

The Good University: what Universities Actually do and why it’s Time for Radical Change I think that the wide breadth of subjects available fits with the enormous variety of Book review personalities. I found it amazing to be tested on my acting ability in Drama, and my critical thinking in History Extension. For this reason, Australian education is not exactly “standardised” in that we can choose our subjects to explore our options. Cooper Forsyth: I do not think that the problem really lies in education at all. Most of my teachers were fantastic, and almost always put in extraordinary amounts of passionate work, long outside of school hours. As I said before, the problem is not what is being taught either. Rethinking exams to make the work less contrived, as Christina suggested, is certainly important, but I think that the core issue is not the education system, but the system that it appears to be for: capitalism. As long as market pressures continue to increase the anxiety to invest in one’s human capital, it becomes harder and harder to see education as being for anything else; and unrealistic to expect anything better. It is essentially a hyperproletarianisation of learning, so tweaking the school system is unlikely to solve the problem. Conclusions for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

The Good University: what Universities Actually do and why it’s Time for Radical Change

History of Education Review , Volume 48 (1): 3 – Jun 3, 2019

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-06-2019-070
Publisher site
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Abstract

I think that the wide breadth of subjects available fits with the enormous variety of Book review personalities. I found it amazing to be tested on my acting ability in Drama, and my critical thinking in History Extension. For this reason, Australian education is not exactly “standardised” in that we can choose our subjects to explore our options. Cooper Forsyth: I do not think that the problem really lies in education at all. Most of my teachers were fantastic, and almost always put in extraordinary amounts of passionate work, long outside of school hours. As I said before, the problem is not what is being taught either. Rethinking exams to make the work less contrived, as Christina suggested, is certainly important, but I think that the core issue is not the education system, but the system that it appears to be for: capitalism. As long as market pressures continue to increase the anxiety to invest in one’s human capital, it becomes harder and harder to see education as being for anything else; and unrealistic to expect anything better. It is essentially a hyperproletarianisation of learning, so tweaking the school system is unlikely to solve the problem. Conclusions for the

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 3, 2019

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