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The German Development of Recoilless Guns for Aircraft

The German Development of Recoilless Guns for Aircraft RECOILLESS guns have been developed in Germany, Russia and America because of the lightness of the whole equipment, relative to the muzzleenergy, that is possible in this class of gun. The German work began about 1937 and such guns 105 cm. L.G.40 were used in the invasion of Crete in 1941. The Russian 3inch recoilless gun was in use a little earlier. American interest in these guns dates from 1943, and a 75 cm. type has been announced. No British recoilless guns have been mentioned, but a theory of the internal ballistics of this form of gun has been published recently by the present writer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

The German Development of Recoilless Guns for Aircraft

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 19 (12): 12 – Dec 1, 1947

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031579
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RECOILLESS guns have been developed in Germany, Russia and America because of the lightness of the whole equipment, relative to the muzzleenergy, that is possible in this class of gun. The German work began about 1937 and such guns 105 cm. L.G.40 were used in the invasion of Crete in 1941. The Russian 3inch recoilless gun was in use a little earlier. American interest in these guns dates from 1943, and a 75 cm. type has been announced. No British recoilless guns have been mentioned, but a theory of the internal ballistics of this form of gun has been published recently by the present writer.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1947

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