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The Free Market Approach to Comparable Worth

The Free Market Approach to Comparable Worth The issue of comparable worth exemplifies the imperfection of market effects. The argument made by proponents of comparable worth is that women earn between 59 to 65 of men's earnings because they are systematically segregated into jobs which are traditionally held by women and traditionally underpaid. Champions of comparable worth argue that each job has an inherent value irrespective of the market, that the market thus is imperfect in its valuation of females in these positions, and that the law should create a hierarchy of job positions which are comparable worth and set wages accordingly. They refuse to accept that an employee's economic worth is determined by his or her salary. Due to this flawed approach, they fail to recognise the incomparable wages derive not from faulty wagevalue scales but from the supply and demand curves that are formed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equal Opportunities International Emerald Publishing

The Free Market Approach to Comparable Worth

Equal Opportunities International , Volume 11 (5): 3 – May 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0261-0159
DOI
10.1108/eb010580
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The issue of comparable worth exemplifies the imperfection of market effects. The argument made by proponents of comparable worth is that women earn between 59 to 65 of men's earnings because they are systematically segregated into jobs which are traditionally held by women and traditionally underpaid. Champions of comparable worth argue that each job has an inherent value irrespective of the market, that the market thus is imperfect in its valuation of females in these positions, and that the law should create a hierarchy of job positions which are comparable worth and set wages accordingly. They refuse to accept that an employee's economic worth is determined by his or her salary. Due to this flawed approach, they fail to recognise the incomparable wages derive not from faulty wagevalue scales but from the supply and demand curves that are formed.

Journal

Equal Opportunities InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1992

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