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The feasibility of using real-time, objective measurements of physiological stress among law enforcement officers in Dallas, Texas

The feasibility of using real-time, objective measurements of physiological stress among law... Law enforcement officers (LEOs) suffer from premature mortality, intentional and unintentional injury, suicide and are at an increased risk for several non-communicable disease outcomes including cardiovascular disease and several cancers, compared to those employed in other occupations. Repeated exposure to stressful and traumatic stimuli is a possible mechanism driving these adverse health outcomes among LEOs. To better identify the sources of these health problems, the purpose of this paper is to determine the feasibility of conducting a cohort study using physiological measures of stress (e.g. heart rate) with LEOs; perceptions of the FitBit device, including LEO buy-in and attitudes associated with the protocol.Design/methodology/approachData were collected from ten recent graduates of the Dallas Police Training Academy.FindingsResults suggest that officer buy-in and protocol compliance was high. Officers were eager to participate in this study, and completion of weekly surveys was 100 percent. Minute-level missing data from wearable devices was relatively low (25 percent), and 90 percent of participants wore the FitBit devices on more than 90 percent of study days.Originality/valueResults from this study suggest that wearable physiological devices can be effectively used in law enforcement populations to measure stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management Emerald Publishing

The feasibility of using real-time, objective measurements of physiological stress among law enforcement officers in Dallas, Texas

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1363-951X
DOI
10.1108/pijpsm-12-2018-0184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Law enforcement officers (LEOs) suffer from premature mortality, intentional and unintentional injury, suicide and are at an increased risk for several non-communicable disease outcomes including cardiovascular disease and several cancers, compared to those employed in other occupations. Repeated exposure to stressful and traumatic stimuli is a possible mechanism driving these adverse health outcomes among LEOs. To better identify the sources of these health problems, the purpose of this paper is to determine the feasibility of conducting a cohort study using physiological measures of stress (e.g. heart rate) with LEOs; perceptions of the FitBit device, including LEO buy-in and attitudes associated with the protocol.Design/methodology/approachData were collected from ten recent graduates of the Dallas Police Training Academy.FindingsResults suggest that officer buy-in and protocol compliance was high. Officers were eager to participate in this study, and completion of weekly surveys was 100 percent. Minute-level missing data from wearable devices was relatively low (25 percent), and 90 percent of participants wore the FitBit devices on more than 90 percent of study days.Originality/valueResults from this study suggest that wearable physiological devices can be effectively used in law enforcement populations to measure stress.

Journal

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 22, 2019

Keywords: Stress; Policing; Physiological measures; Heart rate; Occupational health

References