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The feasibility of delivering group Family Nurse Partnership

The feasibility of delivering group Family Nurse Partnership Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the group family nurse partnership (gFNP) programme, which combines elements of the family nurse partnership (FNP) programme and Centering Pregnancy and is offered from early pregnancy to 12 months postpartum to mothers under 25. Design/methodology/approach– A mixed method descriptive feasibility study. Quantitative data from anonymised forms completed by nurses from November 2009 to May 2011 (pilot 1) and January 2012 to August 2013 (pilot 2) reporting referrals, attendance and client characteristics. Qualitative data collected between March 2010 and April 2011 (pilot 1) and November 2012 and November 2013 (pilot 2) from semi-structured interviews or focus groups with clients and practitioners. Findings– There were challenges to reaching eligible clients. Uptake of gFNP was 57-74 per cent, attendance ranged from 39 to 55 per cent of sessions and attrition ranged from 30 to 50 per cent. Clients never employed attended fewest sessions overall compared to those working full time. The group format and the programme’s content were positively received by clients but many struggled to attend regularly. FNP practitioners were positive overall but involving community practitioners (pilot 2) placed more stress on them. Research limitations/implications– Further feasibility and then cost and effectiveness research is necessary to determine the optimal staffing model. Practical implications– The content and style of support of the home-based FNP programme, available only to first time mothers under 20, could be offered to women over 20 and to those who already have a child. Social implications– A range of interventions is needed to support potentially vulnerable families. Originality/value– This new complex intervention lacks evidence. This paper documents feasibility, the first step in a thorough evaluation process. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Children's Services Emerald Publishing

The feasibility of delivering group Family Nurse Partnership

Journal of Children's Services , Volume 11 (2): 17 – Jun 20, 2016

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1746-6660
DOI
10.1108/JCS-12-2015-0035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the group family nurse partnership (gFNP) programme, which combines elements of the family nurse partnership (FNP) programme and Centering Pregnancy and is offered from early pregnancy to 12 months postpartum to mothers under 25. Design/methodology/approach– A mixed method descriptive feasibility study. Quantitative data from anonymised forms completed by nurses from November 2009 to May 2011 (pilot 1) and January 2012 to August 2013 (pilot 2) reporting referrals, attendance and client characteristics. Qualitative data collected between March 2010 and April 2011 (pilot 1) and November 2012 and November 2013 (pilot 2) from semi-structured interviews or focus groups with clients and practitioners. Findings– There were challenges to reaching eligible clients. Uptake of gFNP was 57-74 per cent, attendance ranged from 39 to 55 per cent of sessions and attrition ranged from 30 to 50 per cent. Clients never employed attended fewest sessions overall compared to those working full time. The group format and the programme’s content were positively received by clients but many struggled to attend regularly. FNP practitioners were positive overall but involving community practitioners (pilot 2) placed more stress on them. Research limitations/implications– Further feasibility and then cost and effectiveness research is necessary to determine the optimal staffing model. Practical implications– The content and style of support of the home-based FNP programme, available only to first time mothers under 20, could be offered to women over 20 and to those who already have a child. Social implications– A range of interventions is needed to support potentially vulnerable families. Originality/value– This new complex intervention lacks evidence. This paper documents feasibility, the first step in a thorough evaluation process.

Journal

Journal of Children's ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 20, 2016

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