The effect of the hot air levelling process on skip solder defects in the wave soldering process

The effect of the hot air levelling process on skip solder defects in the wave soldering process It was observed that “no solder” or “skipped solder” defects occurred on a particular printed circuit board assembly product during wave soldering. Investigations were carried out to find out the cause of this defect and to recommend an optimal hot air level coating thickness. To evaluate whether thicker plating helps to produce better solderability, new printed circuit boards with an average plating thickness of 4.27 μ m were sent for solderability testing. This increase in plating thickness resulted in no defects in the solderability test. This is in contrast to the current printed circuit board that had a no/skipped solder defect rate of 1,433 ppm due to the thinner plating thickness which was in the region of 2.26 μ m. In summary, the investigations made have revealed imperfections in the pad plating, and it is recommended that a thicker or more even plating is achieved during the hot air levelling process at the printed circuit board manufacturing site so as to eliminate no/skipped solder defects that are induced by this printed circuit board deficiency. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Soldering & Surface Mount Technology Emerald Publishing

The effect of the hot air levelling process on skip solder defects in the wave soldering process

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, Volume 15 (2): 7 – Aug 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/the-effect-of-the-hot-air-levelling-process-on-skip-solder-defects-in-0rKGm2AVsO
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0954-0911
DOI
10.1108/09540910310479503
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It was observed that “no solder” or “skipped solder” defects occurred on a particular printed circuit board assembly product during wave soldering. Investigations were carried out to find out the cause of this defect and to recommend an optimal hot air level coating thickness. To evaluate whether thicker plating helps to produce better solderability, new printed circuit boards with an average plating thickness of 4.27 μ m were sent for solderability testing. This increase in plating thickness resulted in no defects in the solderability test. This is in contrast to the current printed circuit board that had a no/skipped solder defect rate of 1,433 ppm due to the thinner plating thickness which was in the region of 2.26 μ m. In summary, the investigations made have revealed imperfections in the pad plating, and it is recommended that a thicker or more even plating is achieved during the hot air levelling process at the printed circuit board manufacturing site so as to eliminate no/skipped solder defects that are induced by this printed circuit board deficiency.

Journal

Soldering & Surface Mount TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2003

Keywords: Wave soldering; Printed circuit boards

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off