Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The effect of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on frontline employees’ knowledge sharing

The effect of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on frontline employees’... This study in the hospitality industry aims to explore the underlying mechanisms through which socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) affects frontline employees’ knowledge sharing, as well as the moderating effects of role conflict and role ambiguity.Design/methodology/approachTwo data waves have been collected from one of the largest restaurant chains in China. Using Mplus 7.0, a structural equation modeling model is empirically tested to investigate the hypothesized moderated mediation model.FindingsFirst, SRHRM appears to foster frontline employees’ perceived respect and organizational trust and further stimulates their knowledge sharing. Second, role conflict is found to weaken the relationship between SRHRM and organizational trust, while role ambiguity seems to weaken the strength of the linkage between SRHRM and perceived respect.Practical implicationsManagers should make SRHRM policies more visible and implement appropriate SRHRM practices to facilitate employees proactively to share knowledge at work. Furthermore, managers should realize the dark side effects of role conflict and role ambiguity, as they might hinder the positive impact of SRHRM on knowledge sharing.Originality/valueThis study uncovers the meditating roles of perceived respect and organizational trust through which SRHRM impacts on employees’ knowledge sharing. By incorporating the possible moderating roles of role conflict and role ambiguity, this scholarly work also increases the understanding of possible hindrances in this regard. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Emerald Publishing

The effect of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on frontline employees’ knowledge sharing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/the-effect-of-socially-responsible-human-resource-management-srhrm-on-1Ya04ZSyqF
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0959-6119
DOI
10.1108/ijchm-09-2018-0769
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study in the hospitality industry aims to explore the underlying mechanisms through which socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) affects frontline employees’ knowledge sharing, as well as the moderating effects of role conflict and role ambiguity.Design/methodology/approachTwo data waves have been collected from one of the largest restaurant chains in China. Using Mplus 7.0, a structural equation modeling model is empirically tested to investigate the hypothesized moderated mediation model.FindingsFirst, SRHRM appears to foster frontline employees’ perceived respect and organizational trust and further stimulates their knowledge sharing. Second, role conflict is found to weaken the relationship between SRHRM and organizational trust, while role ambiguity seems to weaken the strength of the linkage between SRHRM and perceived respect.Practical implicationsManagers should make SRHRM policies more visible and implement appropriate SRHRM practices to facilitate employees proactively to share knowledge at work. Furthermore, managers should realize the dark side effects of role conflict and role ambiguity, as they might hinder the positive impact of SRHRM on knowledge sharing.Originality/valueThis study uncovers the meditating roles of perceived respect and organizational trust through which SRHRM impacts on employees’ knowledge sharing. By incorporating the possible moderating roles of role conflict and role ambiguity, this scholarly work also increases the understanding of possible hindrances in this regard.

Journal

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 17, 2019

Keywords: Knowledge sharing; Organizational trust; Role conflict

References