The effect of corporate social responsibility on employee counterproductive behavior

The effect of corporate social responsibility on employee counterproductive behavior Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the link between corporate social responsibility and financial performance but asserts that there is little empirical evidence on corporate social responsibility and employee attitudes – hence this study. Describes how the survey was carried out (a questionnaire measured on a four‐point Likert scale). Uses t‐tests to evaluate the data. Aims particularly to establish whether or not individuals who value corporate social responsibility exhibit less tolerance of 17 identified counter productive behaviours (such as using organizational services for personal use, padding expense accounts and pilfering organizational supplies). Finds support for the notion that individuals who value corporate social responsibility rate the 17 behaviours as more unethical than individuals who do not especially value corporate social responsibility. Indicates, therefore, that these (more ethical) individuals are less likely to indulge in counter productive behaviour. Recommends ways to back up and extend this research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

The effect of corporate social responsibility on employee counterproductive behavior

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7606
DOI
10.1108/13527609810796835
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the link between corporate social responsibility and financial performance but asserts that there is little empirical evidence on corporate social responsibility and employee attitudes – hence this study. Describes how the survey was carried out (a questionnaire measured on a four‐point Likert scale). Uses t‐tests to evaluate the data. Aims particularly to establish whether or not individuals who value corporate social responsibility exhibit less tolerance of 17 identified counter productive behaviours (such as using organizational services for personal use, padding expense accounts and pilfering organizational supplies). Finds support for the notion that individuals who value corporate social responsibility rate the 17 behaviours as more unethical than individuals who do not especially value corporate social responsibility. Indicates, therefore, that these (more ethical) individuals are less likely to indulge in counter productive behaviour. Recommends ways to back up and extend this research.

Journal

Cross Cultural Management: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1998

Keywords: Employee attitudes; Ethics; Social responsibility

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