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The dilemma of relational embeddedness: mediating roles of influence strategies in managing marketing channel opportunism

The dilemma of relational embeddedness: mediating roles of influence strategies in managing... The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of how relational embeddedness offers marketing channel partners both benefits and hazards. The nonlinear effect of relational embeddedness on channel opportunism is investigated. Influence strategies (i.e. coercive and noncoercive influence) are also examined as mediators of this nonlinear effect.Design/methodology/approachSurvey data are gathered from a sample of 149 manufacturers in China. The hypotheses are tested through regression analysis.FindingsThe results support the hypothesis that relational embeddedness has a U-shaped effect on opportunism, and that this relationship can be mediated through noncoercive influence strategies. The results also indicate that coercive influence has an inverted U-shaped effect and noncoercive influence has a U-shaped effect on opportunism.Research limitations/implicationsThis research serves as a launching point for further investigations into the “black box” of the double-edged effects of relational embeddedness. Other channel behavior constructs can be explored in future studies.Practical implicationsFirms should be aware of the benefits and pitfalls associated with relational embeddedness in marketing channels. They should be alert to using influence strategies when managing channel opportunism.Originality/valueThis study addresses the dilemma of embeddedness in marketing channel relationships and reveals its causes and mechanisms by exploring the mediating effects of influence strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing Emerald Publishing

The dilemma of relational embeddedness: mediating roles of influence strategies in managing marketing channel opportunism

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0885-8624
eISSN
0885-8624
DOI
10.1108/jbim-01-2020-0021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of how relational embeddedness offers marketing channel partners both benefits and hazards. The nonlinear effect of relational embeddedness on channel opportunism is investigated. Influence strategies (i.e. coercive and noncoercive influence) are also examined as mediators of this nonlinear effect.Design/methodology/approachSurvey data are gathered from a sample of 149 manufacturers in China. The hypotheses are tested through regression analysis.FindingsThe results support the hypothesis that relational embeddedness has a U-shaped effect on opportunism, and that this relationship can be mediated through noncoercive influence strategies. The results also indicate that coercive influence has an inverted U-shaped effect and noncoercive influence has a U-shaped effect on opportunism.Research limitations/implicationsThis research serves as a launching point for further investigations into the “black box” of the double-edged effects of relational embeddedness. Other channel behavior constructs can be explored in future studies.Practical implicationsFirms should be aware of the benefits and pitfalls associated with relational embeddedness in marketing channels. They should be alert to using influence strategies when managing channel opportunism.Originality/valueThis study addresses the dilemma of embeddedness in marketing channel relationships and reveals its causes and mechanisms by exploring the mediating effects of influence strategies.

Journal

Journal of Business & Industrial MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: May 25, 2021

Keywords: Opportunism; Influence strategies; Relational embeddedness; Coercive influence; Noncoercive influence

References