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The development of facilities and estate management in the Scottish central government civil estate 1989-2015

The development of facilities and estate management in the Scottish central government civil... PurposeThe paper aims to examine how Scottish facility and estate managers have developed estates and facilities management strategies to ensure that the Scottish government civil estate has remained fit for purpose in a period of rapid social, economic and technological change, and political development covering the devolution period.Design/methodology/approachThis paper examines the development of the policy frameworks within which facility mangers have worked and how they have adapted the asset portfolio to meet the demands of modern working practices and the budgetary disciplines resulting from economic change.FindingsThe period 1989-2015 has shown major changes. It commenced with a highly centralised model driven by the Whitehall Department of the Treasury and run by the Property Services Agency. Just before and during devolution, there was administrative decentralisation of activity to agencies and non-departmental public bodies, and this was reflected in decentralised property management first to departments and then to the agencies and non-departmental public bodies. During this time, profound changes occurred in working practices, e-mail, e-records, mobile telephones and open-plan layouts; remote working changed the ways buildings were used. Public sector property was used to promote distribution of jobs to outer areas. Towards the latter end of the period from 2008 onwards, the economic difficulties have led to acute budget pressures, and from 2011 onwards, there has been a trend both in Whitehall, and the Scottish devolved administration towards greater corporate management of the estate to drive down costs and promote more modern ways of working which may lead to a model similar to the one which prevailed at the start of the period.Research limitations/implicationsThe paper explains the development of the management framework and changes on the estate itself to inform the debate between policymakers, academic researchers and FM practitioners interested in the efficient use of central government assets.Practical implicationsThe paper will help academics and practitioners understand the historic context within which they are working.Social implicationsThe paper indicates how the Scottish Government has adapted its property assets to meet the needs of users.Originality/valueThe paper is an historic exposition of how public sector facility managers have adapted the management of the Scottish Government estate in Scotland to meet the needs of central government staff and the public to whom it provides wider services and considers how this illuminates wider FM issues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Facilities Management Emerald Publishing

The development of facilities and estate management in the Scottish central government civil estate 1989-2015

Journal of Facilities Management , Volume 14 (2): 9 – May 3, 2016

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1472-5967
DOI
10.1108/JFM-10-2015-0032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe paper aims to examine how Scottish facility and estate managers have developed estates and facilities management strategies to ensure that the Scottish government civil estate has remained fit for purpose in a period of rapid social, economic and technological change, and political development covering the devolution period.Design/methodology/approachThis paper examines the development of the policy frameworks within which facility mangers have worked and how they have adapted the asset portfolio to meet the demands of modern working practices and the budgetary disciplines resulting from economic change.FindingsThe period 1989-2015 has shown major changes. It commenced with a highly centralised model driven by the Whitehall Department of the Treasury and run by the Property Services Agency. Just before and during devolution, there was administrative decentralisation of activity to agencies and non-departmental public bodies, and this was reflected in decentralised property management first to departments and then to the agencies and non-departmental public bodies. During this time, profound changes occurred in working practices, e-mail, e-records, mobile telephones and open-plan layouts; remote working changed the ways buildings were used. Public sector property was used to promote distribution of jobs to outer areas. Towards the latter end of the period from 2008 onwards, the economic difficulties have led to acute budget pressures, and from 2011 onwards, there has been a trend both in Whitehall, and the Scottish devolved administration towards greater corporate management of the estate to drive down costs and promote more modern ways of working which may lead to a model similar to the one which prevailed at the start of the period.Research limitations/implicationsThe paper explains the development of the management framework and changes on the estate itself to inform the debate between policymakers, academic researchers and FM practitioners interested in the efficient use of central government assets.Practical implicationsThe paper will help academics and practitioners understand the historic context within which they are working.Social implicationsThe paper indicates how the Scottish Government has adapted its property assets to meet the needs of users.Originality/valueThe paper is an historic exposition of how public sector facility managers have adapted the management of the Scottish Government estate in Scotland to meet the needs of central government staff and the public to whom it provides wider services and considers how this illuminates wider FM issues.

Journal

Journal of Facilities ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: May 3, 2016

References