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The connected histories of mass schooling and public health

The connected histories of mass schooling and public health HER Guest editorial 46,2 118 We begin our introduction to this special issue with two cases from Australia that in different ways and for different historical contexts offer insights into the need for more engaged, empirical investigation of the interconnected histories of mass schooling and public health. Case 1: public health and the politics of school funding One of the best known episodes in the history of Australian schooling involves a dispute in the early 1960s between government health regulators and a country Catholic primary school over whether the church or the state should pay for the upgrade of a boys’ toilet block, after a government inspection found them to be inadequate. The local fight escalated into a major political crisis, which has since been identified as a key turning point in the combative politics of Australian school funding (Hogan, 1978; Campbell and Proctor, 2014). In brief, all the Catholic schools in the large country town of Goulburn went on strike over the issue, causing temporary chaos at the local public schools, which were suddenly forced to enrol hundreds of extra students. This, as the story goes, forced the governments of the day to recognise that Catholic schools were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

The connected histories of mass schooling and public health

History of Education Review , Volume 46 (2): 7 – Oct 2, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-06-2017-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HER Guest editorial 46,2 118 We begin our introduction to this special issue with two cases from Australia that in different ways and for different historical contexts offer insights into the need for more engaged, empirical investigation of the interconnected histories of mass schooling and public health. Case 1: public health and the politics of school funding One of the best known episodes in the history of Australian schooling involves a dispute in the early 1960s between government health regulators and a country Catholic primary school over whether the church or the state should pay for the upgrade of a boys’ toilet block, after a government inspection found them to be inadequate. The local fight escalated into a major political crisis, which has since been identified as a key turning point in the combative politics of Australian school funding (Hogan, 1978; Campbell and Proctor, 2014). In brief, all the Catholic schools in the large country town of Goulburn went on strike over the issue, causing temporary chaos at the local public schools, which were suddenly forced to enrol hundreds of extra students. This, as the story goes, forced the governments of the day to recognise that Catholic schools were

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 2, 2017

References