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The complexity of children’s involvement in school bullying

The complexity of children’s involvement in school bullying PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine the complexity of children’s involvement in school bullying from the child’s perspective.Design/methodology/approachA Foucauldian perspective provides a more nuanced approach than traditional understandings for examining the fluidity of power which involves “grey” areas; struggles between pupils, and pupils and teachers; and takes into account systemic factors. Data are drawn from observations, focus groups and individual interviews with children aged 10-16.FindingsChildren explained how pupils, teachers and inequalities inherent in school contributed to their involvement. Children felt coerced into reinforcing societal inequalities whereby the “vulnerable” were susceptible to victimisation and pupils can achieve status through bullying. Several working-class males who had learning difficulties felt “picked on” by their peers and teachers, and subsequently retaliated aggressively.Research limitations/implicationsFindings from this relatively small sample provide insight into children’s unique experiences and how they are produced within wider systems of knowledge which differ from traditionally accepted discourses.Practical implicationsPupils should have an input into the development and implementation of institutional strategies to tackle bullying.Social implicationsTraditional ways of identifying “bullies” can be used to target those already marginalised whilst more sophisticated bullying is usually accepted and approved.Originality/valueThe complexity, fluidity and multi-faceted nature of children’s involvement is highlighted. Children discussed the maltreatment they experienced from pupils and teachers but did not realise how they may have subjected them to bullying. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Children's Services Emerald Publishing

The complexity of children’s involvement in school bullying

Journal of Children's Services , Volume 12 (4): 14 – Dec 18, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1746-6660
DOI
10.1108/JCS-03-2017-0009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine the complexity of children’s involvement in school bullying from the child’s perspective.Design/methodology/approachA Foucauldian perspective provides a more nuanced approach than traditional understandings for examining the fluidity of power which involves “grey” areas; struggles between pupils, and pupils and teachers; and takes into account systemic factors. Data are drawn from observations, focus groups and individual interviews with children aged 10-16.FindingsChildren explained how pupils, teachers and inequalities inherent in school contributed to their involvement. Children felt coerced into reinforcing societal inequalities whereby the “vulnerable” were susceptible to victimisation and pupils can achieve status through bullying. Several working-class males who had learning difficulties felt “picked on” by their peers and teachers, and subsequently retaliated aggressively.Research limitations/implicationsFindings from this relatively small sample provide insight into children’s unique experiences and how they are produced within wider systems of knowledge which differ from traditionally accepted discourses.Practical implicationsPupils should have an input into the development and implementation of institutional strategies to tackle bullying.Social implicationsTraditional ways of identifying “bullies” can be used to target those already marginalised whilst more sophisticated bullying is usually accepted and approved.Originality/valueThe complexity, fluidity and multi-faceted nature of children’s involvement is highlighted. Children discussed the maltreatment they experienced from pupils and teachers but did not realise how they may have subjected them to bullying.

Journal

Journal of Children's ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 18, 2017

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