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The competing values framework

The competing values framework PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to explore how the competing values framework (CVF) could be used by public service leaders to analyze and better understand public sector leadership challenges, thereby improving their ability in leading across borders and generations.Design/methodology/approachThis paper applies the CVF, originally developed for understanding leadership in the private sector and shows how it can be adapted for analyzing and developing skill in addressing different leadership challenges in public sector contexts, including setting out specific learning exercises.FindingsThe paper has four parts. The first provides an overview of the origins, logic, and evolution of the CVF. The second part shows how the CVF is relevant and useful for assessing management and leadership values in the public sector. The third part identifies specific leadership challenges and learning exercises for public sector leaders at different stages of development. The final part concludes by reflecting on the CVF and similar frameworks, and where future research might go.Research limitations/implicationsBecause of the chosen research approach, propositions within the paper should be tentatively applied.Practical implicationsThis paper provides guidance for the better understanding of complex leadership challenges within the public sector through the use of the CVF.Social implicationsThe social implications of the paper could include the more widespread use of the CVF within the public sector as a tool to lead more effectively.Originality/valueThis paper adapts and extends an analytical tool that has been of high value in the private sector so that it can be used in the public sector. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Leadership Emerald Publishing

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References (42)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4929
DOI
10.1108/IJPL-01-2016-0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to explore how the competing values framework (CVF) could be used by public service leaders to analyze and better understand public sector leadership challenges, thereby improving their ability in leading across borders and generations.Design/methodology/approachThis paper applies the CVF, originally developed for understanding leadership in the private sector and shows how it can be adapted for analyzing and developing skill in addressing different leadership challenges in public sector contexts, including setting out specific learning exercises.FindingsThe paper has four parts. The first provides an overview of the origins, logic, and evolution of the CVF. The second part shows how the CVF is relevant and useful for assessing management and leadership values in the public sector. The third part identifies specific leadership challenges and learning exercises for public sector leaders at different stages of development. The final part concludes by reflecting on the CVF and similar frameworks, and where future research might go.Research limitations/implicationsBecause of the chosen research approach, propositions within the paper should be tentatively applied.Practical implicationsThis paper provides guidance for the better understanding of complex leadership challenges within the public sector through the use of the CVF.Social implicationsThe social implications of the paper could include the more widespread use of the CVF within the public sector as a tool to lead more effectively.Originality/valueThis paper adapts and extends an analytical tool that has been of high value in the private sector so that it can be used in the public sector.

Journal

International Journal of Public LeadershipEmerald Publishing

Published: May 9, 2016

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