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The changing nature of work and stress

The changing nature of work and stress Considers the architecture and production of everyday life and its positive outcomes, as well as ways of disrupting it, resulting in the loss of these outcomes. Indirectly, such disruption might be brought about by the possible effects of the huge, interacting global changes (in the fields of macro-economics, technology, culture and politics) on our organisations. These changes force organisations to change themselves too, in order to survive. Some of these forms of adaptation are discussed. Looking at their consequences on the everyday life of their employees, the article roughly distinguishes two kinds of consequences. The article indicates a number of possible sources of stress, and some approaches and interventions that may mitigate their possible harmful effects. Moreover, it concludes that such interventions can have more general positive effects for the organisation, because stress-related complaints can be indicators of underlying factors that may negatively affect other organisational goals as well. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

The changing nature of work and stress

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References (17)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
DOI
10.1108/02683940010320589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Considers the architecture and production of everyday life and its positive outcomes, as well as ways of disrupting it, resulting in the loss of these outcomes. Indirectly, such disruption might be brought about by the possible effects of the huge, interacting global changes (in the fields of macro-economics, technology, culture and politics) on our organisations. These changes force organisations to change themselves too, in order to survive. Some of these forms of adaptation are discussed. Looking at their consequences on the everyday life of their employees, the article roughly distinguishes two kinds of consequences. The article indicates a number of possible sources of stress, and some approaches and interventions that may mitigate their possible harmful effects. Moreover, it concludes that such interventions can have more general positive effects for the organisation, because stress-related complaints can be indicators of underlying factors that may negatively affect other organisational goals as well.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 2000

Keywords: Quality of working life; Patterns of work; Organizational change

There are no references for this article.