The British Food Journal Volume 57 Issue 10 1955

The British Food Journal Volume 57 Issue 10 1955 In his Annual Report, Mr. W. A. Davenport, Chief Inspector of Weights and Measures for Buckinghamshire, includes a dissertation full of wisdom, as we think on the Merchandise Marks Act, which, he states, are designed to achieve two distinct objects. The older and more important object is to ensure that goods shall not, with impunity, be sold as something better than they really are. The later and more restricted object is to help the sale of certain agricultural and fishery products of the United Kingdom in competition with imported goods of the same class. The first is attained under the 1887 Act, by prohibiting false claims of almost any kind the second, under the 1926 Act, by compelling a true disclosure of the country of origin where this is outside the United Kingdom. Neither of these Acts imposes a duty on the Council, but whilst the 1887 Act is open to be enforced by anyone, it is expressed that the 1926 Act may be enforced by Food and Drugs Authorities, a provision which has the effect of precluding its enforcement by anyone else. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

The British Food Journal Volume 57 Issue 10 1955

British Food Journal, Volume 57 (10): 8 – Oct 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/eb011524
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In his Annual Report, Mr. W. A. Davenport, Chief Inspector of Weights and Measures for Buckinghamshire, includes a dissertation full of wisdom, as we think on the Merchandise Marks Act, which, he states, are designed to achieve two distinct objects. The older and more important object is to ensure that goods shall not, with impunity, be sold as something better than they really are. The later and more restricted object is to help the sale of certain agricultural and fishery products of the United Kingdom in competition with imported goods of the same class. The first is attained under the 1887 Act, by prohibiting false claims of almost any kind the second, under the 1926 Act, by compelling a true disclosure of the country of origin where this is outside the United Kingdom. Neither of these Acts imposes a duty on the Council, but whilst the 1887 Act is open to be enforced by anyone, it is expressed that the 1926 Act may be enforced by Food and Drugs Authorities, a provision which has the effect of precluding its enforcement by anyone else.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1955

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