The Bristish Food Journal Volume 30 Issue 9 1928

The Bristish Food Journal Volume 30 Issue 9 1928 The provisions of the Fertilisers and Feeding Stuffs Act, 1926, which came into force on July 1st, are based upon the recommendations of two committees which sat during 192325, the first of which suggested the general lines of the Act, while the second prepared the schedules of articles coming within its scope. Although the Act received Royal Assent in December, 1926, it has not been practicable to bring it into operation until the regulations governing such matters as methods of sampling and analysis, methods of marking parcels, and limits of variation, had been prepared and published. These regulations were published in draft form in February, 1928, and in their final form during May. The general purpose of the Act, like that of the Act of 1906 which it repeals, is to provide civil remedies in cases of misdescription of, and to prevent fraud in, fertilisers and feeding stuffs. Its scope is defined by means of schedules which may be extended or varied, whenever the need arises, by regulations. One of the principal objects in replacing the Act of 1906 by new legislation was to separate, as far as possible, civil proceedings and criminal proceedings, in order to encourage farmers to exercise their civil rights without involving their suppliers in police court proceedings. The civil provisions of the Act are those which enact that buyers of the fertilisers and feeding stuffs in common use shall be furnished with a warranty covering certain important points, and which, further, afford them the means of testing these warranties with a view to formulating a claim where they are not fulfilled. The first requirement of the Act is that every person who sells for use as a fertiliser or as a feeding stuff for cattle or poultry any article included in either the First or the Second Schedule to the Act shall give the purchaser a written statement called the statutory statement showing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

The Bristish Food Journal Volume 30 Issue 9 1928

British Food Journal, Volume 30 (9): 10 – Sep 1, 1928

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/eb011202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The provisions of the Fertilisers and Feeding Stuffs Act, 1926, which came into force on July 1st, are based upon the recommendations of two committees which sat during 192325, the first of which suggested the general lines of the Act, while the second prepared the schedules of articles coming within its scope. Although the Act received Royal Assent in December, 1926, it has not been practicable to bring it into operation until the regulations governing such matters as methods of sampling and analysis, methods of marking parcels, and limits of variation, had been prepared and published. These regulations were published in draft form in February, 1928, and in their final form during May. The general purpose of the Act, like that of the Act of 1906 which it repeals, is to provide civil remedies in cases of misdescription of, and to prevent fraud in, fertilisers and feeding stuffs. Its scope is defined by means of schedules which may be extended or varied, whenever the need arises, by regulations. One of the principal objects in replacing the Act of 1906 by new legislation was to separate, as far as possible, civil proceedings and criminal proceedings, in order to encourage farmers to exercise their civil rights without involving their suppliers in police court proceedings. The civil provisions of the Act are those which enact that buyers of the fertilisers and feeding stuffs in common use shall be furnished with a warranty covering certain important points, and which, further, afford them the means of testing these warranties with a view to formulating a claim where they are not fulfilled. The first requirement of the Act is that every person who sells for use as a fertiliser or as a feeding stuff for cattle or poultry any article included in either the First or the Second Schedule to the Act shall give the purchaser a written statement called the statutory statement showing

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1928

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