Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Thank You S.B.A.C.

Thank You S.B.A.C. Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 248 OCTOBER 1949 noon watching the flying is quite essential; but, unless he is spartan enough to go without food, it is almost impossible for him to find N introducing the survey of the [S.B.A.C. Display] by M R HULS opportunity for more than a rapid walk through the exhibition hall, which is the principal feature of this issue we desire to call atten­ with little time to stop and examine anything. However, most of us I tion to an aspect of it which is not apparent from the internal would no doubt prefer indigestion from an excess of provender evidence afforded by mere perusal. It is not, as would be expected to starvation from a lack of it. of an article written by a foreigner, a translation but is the English text as written by the author himself. Netherlanders are of course Getting Ahead famous for their command of our language, but even among a nation of linguists there can be few who are capable of producing an article of The almost dramatic appearance this year of one jet and no less this length with complete freedom from the solecisms usually found than four propeller turbine airliners was most heartening to the when a writer attempts to express his thoughts in other than his British who for the last four years have had to be content to watch mother tongue. So idiomatic, in fact, is the mode of expression that American developments of war-time transports fill their skies. At it is only most rarely that the uninformed reader would suspect that last we can lift up our heads again and truthfully say that we have the writer is not an Englishman. MR HULS is much to be con­ regained the lead. It is indeed encouraging that a commentator of gratulated on his remarkable achievement. M R HULS eminence finds himself able to assure us that some of these are "years ahead" of anything the U.S.A. can offer. Our aeroplane designers have worthily taken advantage of the lead gained by our A Notable Success engine designers by producing commercial types incorporating the By general consent, the 1949 Display was quite outstanding and unchallengeably superior British jet turbine and propeller turbine registered a tremendous advance on the other post-war exhibitions. engines. Two of these, the jet Comet and the turbo-prop Viscount, The concentration of the whole of the static exhibits under one roof are already going into production on the strength of orders received was a very great improvement over last year's arrangement and from the Corporations and, although the development period of a altogether the whole organization was quite brilliant. The smooth modern airliner is unpleasantly long, they should be 'showing the flow of the flying was the subject of favourable comment on all flag' on the world's air routes some years before other countries sides and reflected great credit on those responsible for organizing it. have anything to match them. The only departure from perfection in the arrangements—and we confess we see no way of overcoming the difficulty—was the regret­ Subject for Research tably short time available for close examination of the aeroplanes in the park before the spectators had to leave when the machines The gas-turbine engine offers great advantages from the passen­ started to move to their positions out on the aerodrome. Even for ger's point of view in reduction of vibration, which will make air those who attended every day, approximately an hour and a half travel in the future notably more attractive. On the other hand, they each morning was hardly adequate time in which to examine every­ do at present produce the most trying noise. With careful layout thing and take photographs of any special features it was desired and location of seating accommodation this will not probably to record. The obvious solution would of course be to park the affect the passenger so much, but it does add intolerably to the aeroplanes in the places they are to occupy conveniently for the burden of the already long-suffering ordinary person on the ground. afternoon's flying, but we do not feel that this suggestion is really There is reason to hope, we believe, that the noise can be largely practical as it would mean their being so far removed from the eliminated by careful attention to certain points in design. The sooner exhibition hall. That would not, perhaps, matter so much if this concentrated research and experiment is put in hand to achieve this year's remarkable weather could always be relied upon, but this most desirable—and indeed essential—end, the better. We would was merely the fortunate outcome of an unusual summer. give it top priority. By contrast with the promise for the future held out by the quintet of airliners the new fighters were almost an anti-climax, An Inclination to Surfeit except as exemplifications of the virtuosity of the modern pilot. Here again, however, the Supermarine 510 and the Hawker 1052—to say The concentration of an exhibition of stands, static display of nothing of the Avon-Meteor with its incredible climb—were, we aeroplanes on the ground and demonstration of their performances believe, ahead of anything to be found anywhere else in the world in the air all at the one place at the same time makes the Display quite unique in its attraction—and certainly a great improvement if the twin essentials of performance and manoeuvrability are taken into account. on the Paris fortnight. It none the less makes the task of the indivi­ dual—particularly if visiting the event for only one, or even two, Finally, whatever be the commercial and economic justification days—who wishes to see everything almost insuperable. He has, as of the Brabazon—and we fully share the doubts of M R HULS— we have pointed out, little enough time in the morning to make a there can be no two opinions of its outstanding merit as a magnificent detailed examination of the aeroplanes, while spending the after­ example of engineering achievement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Thank You S.B.A.C.

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 21 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1949

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/thank-you-s-b-a-c-30XvWDrPuq
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031814
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 248 OCTOBER 1949 noon watching the flying is quite essential; but, unless he is spartan enough to go without food, it is almost impossible for him to find N introducing the survey of the [S.B.A.C. Display] by M R HULS opportunity for more than a rapid walk through the exhibition hall, which is the principal feature of this issue we desire to call atten­ with little time to stop and examine anything. However, most of us I tion to an aspect of it which is not apparent from the internal would no doubt prefer indigestion from an excess of provender evidence afforded by mere perusal. It is not, as would be expected to starvation from a lack of it. of an article written by a foreigner, a translation but is the English text as written by the author himself. Netherlanders are of course Getting Ahead famous for their command of our language, but even among a nation of linguists there can be few who are capable of producing an article of The almost dramatic appearance this year of one jet and no less this length with complete freedom from the solecisms usually found than four propeller turbine airliners was most heartening to the when a writer attempts to express his thoughts in other than his British who for the last four years have had to be content to watch mother tongue. So idiomatic, in fact, is the mode of expression that American developments of war-time transports fill their skies. At it is only most rarely that the uninformed reader would suspect that last we can lift up our heads again and truthfully say that we have the writer is not an Englishman. MR HULS is much to be con­ regained the lead. It is indeed encouraging that a commentator of gratulated on his remarkable achievement. M R HULS eminence finds himself able to assure us that some of these are "years ahead" of anything the U.S.A. can offer. Our aeroplane designers have worthily taken advantage of the lead gained by our A Notable Success engine designers by producing commercial types incorporating the By general consent, the 1949 Display was quite outstanding and unchallengeably superior British jet turbine and propeller turbine registered a tremendous advance on the other post-war exhibitions. engines. Two of these, the jet Comet and the turbo-prop Viscount, The concentration of the whole of the static exhibits under one roof are already going into production on the strength of orders received was a very great improvement over last year's arrangement and from the Corporations and, although the development period of a altogether the whole organization was quite brilliant. The smooth modern airliner is unpleasantly long, they should be 'showing the flow of the flying was the subject of favourable comment on all flag' on the world's air routes some years before other countries sides and reflected great credit on those responsible for organizing it. have anything to match them. The only departure from perfection in the arrangements—and we confess we see no way of overcoming the difficulty—was the regret­ Subject for Research tably short time available for close examination of the aeroplanes in the park before the spectators had to leave when the machines The gas-turbine engine offers great advantages from the passen­ started to move to their positions out on the aerodrome. Even for ger's point of view in reduction of vibration, which will make air those who attended every day, approximately an hour and a half travel in the future notably more attractive. On the other hand, they each morning was hardly adequate time in which to examine every­ do at present produce the most trying noise. With careful layout thing and take photographs of any special features it was desired and location of seating accommodation this will not probably to record. The obvious solution would of course be to park the affect the passenger so much, but it does add intolerably to the aeroplanes in the places they are to occupy conveniently for the burden of the already long-suffering ordinary person on the ground. afternoon's flying, but we do not feel that this suggestion is really There is reason to hope, we believe, that the noise can be largely practical as it would mean their being so far removed from the eliminated by careful attention to certain points in design. The sooner exhibition hall. That would not, perhaps, matter so much if this concentrated research and experiment is put in hand to achieve this year's remarkable weather could always be relied upon, but this most desirable—and indeed essential—end, the better. We would was merely the fortunate outcome of an unusual summer. give it top priority. By contrast with the promise for the future held out by the quintet of airliners the new fighters were almost an anti-climax, An Inclination to Surfeit except as exemplifications of the virtuosity of the modern pilot. Here again, however, the Supermarine 510 and the Hawker 1052—to say The concentration of an exhibition of stands, static display of nothing of the Avon-Meteor with its incredible climb—were, we aeroplanes on the ground and demonstration of their performances believe, ahead of anything to be found anywhere else in the world in the air all at the one place at the same time makes the Display quite unique in its attraction—and certainly a great improvement if the twin essentials of performance and manoeuvrability are taken into account. on the Paris fortnight. It none the less makes the task of the indivi­ dual—particularly if visiting the event for only one, or even two, Finally, whatever be the commercial and economic justification days—who wishes to see everything almost insuperable. He has, as of the Brabazon—and we fully share the doubts of M R HULS— we have pointed out, little enough time in the morning to make a there can be no two opinions of its outstanding merit as a magnificent detailed examination of the aeroplanes, while spending the after­ example of engineering achievement.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1949

There are no references for this article.