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Team emergent states and team effectiveness: the roles of inclusive leadership and knowledge sharing

Team emergent states and team effectiveness: the roles of inclusive leadership and knowledge sharing The purposes of the study are to examine the relationships between team emergent states (TES) (i.e. compelling direction, team identity and psychological safety) and team effectiveness outcomes (i.e. team performance, team satisfaction and growth experience), and investigate the mediating role of knowledge sharing and the moderating role of inclusive leadership in those relationships.Design/methodology/approachThis study employed hierarchical multiple regression analysis and bootstrap analyses to test the hypotheses by using data from 73 teams in eight South Korean firms.FindingsPsychological safety was found to be a significant TES for team effectiveness outcomes. Knowledge sharing mediated the relationship between TES and team effectiveness. Lastly, inclusive leadership positively moderated (1) team identity-knowledge sharing; (2) psychological safety-knowledge sharing; and (3) team identity-team performance relationships.Practical implicationsThe authors’ findings suggest that managers cultivate a psychologically safe team climate and show inclusiveness to build successful teams. This study also emphasizes the importance of knowledge sharing to turn positive TES into team effectiveness.Originality/valueFrom a comprehensive perspective, the findings show the detailed mechanism in which TES relate to team effectiveness mediated by knowledge sharing. In particular, the authors' endeavor further determines the different roles of inclusive leadership, as a boundary condition, in the mechanism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance Emerald Publishing

Team emergent states and team effectiveness: the roles of inclusive leadership and knowledge sharing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2051-6614
DOI
10.1108/joepp-05-2021-0120
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purposes of the study are to examine the relationships between team emergent states (TES) (i.e. compelling direction, team identity and psychological safety) and team effectiveness outcomes (i.e. team performance, team satisfaction and growth experience), and investigate the mediating role of knowledge sharing and the moderating role of inclusive leadership in those relationships.Design/methodology/approachThis study employed hierarchical multiple regression analysis and bootstrap analyses to test the hypotheses by using data from 73 teams in eight South Korean firms.FindingsPsychological safety was found to be a significant TES for team effectiveness outcomes. Knowledge sharing mediated the relationship between TES and team effectiveness. Lastly, inclusive leadership positively moderated (1) team identity-knowledge sharing; (2) psychological safety-knowledge sharing; and (3) team identity-team performance relationships.Practical implicationsThe authors’ findings suggest that managers cultivate a psychologically safe team climate and show inclusiveness to build successful teams. This study also emphasizes the importance of knowledge sharing to turn positive TES into team effectiveness.Originality/valueFrom a comprehensive perspective, the findings show the detailed mechanism in which TES relate to team effectiveness mediated by knowledge sharing. In particular, the authors' endeavor further determines the different roles of inclusive leadership, as a boundary condition, in the mechanism.

Journal

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and PerformanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 22, 2022

Keywords: Team effectiveness; Inclusive leadership; Knowledge sharing; Compelling direction; Team identity; Psychological safety

References