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TALK is Cheap

TALK is Cheap Aaron Weissman Bowdoin College Library Brunswick, ME 04011 Our eagerly awaited M300 Workstation download data to a blank formatted arrived in the fall of 1984 and was in­ diskette in drive B. We've even over­ stalled in the Reference Department, come being nervous about making costly where it was to be used primarily for spelling errors while online to an ex­ interlibrary loan. Once we had worked pensive database. We can preset search our way through the mysteries of disk­ strategies offline and speedily transmit ettes, booting, DOS, and other arcane them at the touch of a function key or lingo, we were off and running. Our the combined keys <CTRL><SHIFT> next question was, what else could we <an y number key> . do with it? Chapter 5 of the OCLC M300 We were glad to send our S35 con­ Guide to Operations, "Other M300 tribution to the publisher, because we're Uses," seemed to hold the answer. saving a lot more than that in connect time. As the Mar. 1985 issue of OCLC Mi­ We'd been searching DIALOG using cro explained (p. 11), OCLC offers the a small terminal/printer plus a modem and were looking forward to seeing these 1983 version of the program on disk searches displayed on the M300 screen OMPX005 for S6 (to cover postage and and simultaneously printed. We care­ handling). It's worth it; similar commer­ cial programs are advertised at S75 to fully set up an OCLC Terminal Software S250. diskette according to the instructions, started it up, and were soon connected. The problems we experienced using our M300 Workstation in dial-up mode have now been fixed with version 2.0 of Merrily We the terminal software. However, as a Rolled Along. . . result of those problems, we discovered A DIALOG session begins with the a communications program that we're very pleased with. transmission of system news items, which we usually stopped by hitting a "break" key, thus saving on connect More Ways to Save time. The OCLC Guide said that hitting We use another excellent, inexpensive < FI2 > would send a break signal. We program, PC-FILE III, to store data about hit it; nothing happened. The news kept our student assistants. We tried PC- rolling on. WRITE, yet another freeware program, Then we began searching a data­ for word processing. We found it base and decided to print the screen by powerful but hard to learn and felt that hitting <SHIFT><PRINT>. This sent the documentation was somewhat ob­ the program into an endless loop, print­ scure. Both of these programs are also ing the screen over and over again. available through the OMPX program. What a Break! At last, I phoned our State Library's microcomputer specialist and he offered to send us a copy of PC-TALK, a "free­ ware" communications program. The program turned out to be a pleasure to use. With PC-TALK, we generate breaks easily, print without problems, and OCLC Micro Vol. 1, No. 2 May 1985 21 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png OCLC Micro Emerald Publishing

TALK is Cheap

OCLC Micro , Volume 1 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1985

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
8756-5196
DOI
10.1108/eb055724
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aaron Weissman Bowdoin College Library Brunswick, ME 04011 Our eagerly awaited M300 Workstation download data to a blank formatted arrived in the fall of 1984 and was in­ diskette in drive B. We've even over­ stalled in the Reference Department, come being nervous about making costly where it was to be used primarily for spelling errors while online to an ex­ interlibrary loan. Once we had worked pensive database. We can preset search our way through the mysteries of disk­ strategies offline and speedily transmit ettes, booting, DOS, and other arcane them at the touch of a function key or lingo, we were off and running. Our the combined keys <CTRL><SHIFT> next question was, what else could we <an y number key> . do with it? Chapter 5 of the OCLC M300 We were glad to send our S35 con­ Guide to Operations, "Other M300 tribution to the publisher, because we're Uses," seemed to hold the answer. saving a lot more than that in connect time. As the Mar. 1985 issue of OCLC Mi­ We'd been searching DIALOG using cro explained (p. 11), OCLC offers the a small terminal/printer plus a modem and were looking forward to seeing these 1983 version of the program on disk searches displayed on the M300 screen OMPX005 for S6 (to cover postage and and simultaneously printed. We care­ handling). It's worth it; similar commer­ cial programs are advertised at S75 to fully set up an OCLC Terminal Software S250. diskette according to the instructions, started it up, and were soon connected. The problems we experienced using our M300 Workstation in dial-up mode have now been fixed with version 2.0 of Merrily We the terminal software. However, as a Rolled Along. . . result of those problems, we discovered A DIALOG session begins with the a communications program that we're very pleased with. transmission of system news items, which we usually stopped by hitting a "break" key, thus saving on connect More Ways to Save time. The OCLC Guide said that hitting We use another excellent, inexpensive < FI2 > would send a break signal. We program, PC-FILE III, to store data about hit it; nothing happened. The news kept our student assistants. We tried PC- rolling on. WRITE, yet another freeware program, Then we began searching a data­ for word processing. We found it base and decided to print the screen by powerful but hard to learn and felt that hitting <SHIFT><PRINT>. This sent the documentation was somewhat ob­ the program into an endless loop, print­ scure. Both of these programs are also ing the screen over and over again. available through the OMPX program. What a Break! At last, I phoned our State Library's microcomputer specialist and he offered to send us a copy of PC-TALK, a "free­ ware" communications program. The program turned out to be a pleasure to use. With PC-TALK, we generate breaks easily, print without problems, and OCLC Micro Vol. 1, No. 2 May 1985 21

Journal

OCLC MicroEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1985

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