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Tackling The Skills Crisis

Tackling The Skills Crisis Tackling The Skills Crisis AN aircraft maintenance company and a college of technology have joined forces to tackle a major skills crisis in the aviation industry. The new join t venture brings together Qualitair Aviation Group and Solihull College of Technology, and will open its doors in May. Known as the Qualitair School of Aircraft Maintenance, it is planned to courses will be arranged for airline become the major independent centre in clients in addition to Qualitair staff. the UK specialising in training aircraft David Johnson, Qualitair group's maintenance engineers and technicians. engineering director, says that when the school is fully operational, in about workers for the new £50 million aircraft The school is based on the Solihull three years time, more than 1,000 maintenance facility which Qualitair is college campus, where construction of a purpose-built teaching and administra­ students a year will pass through its planning at Birmingham International tion building is now well advanced. It doors on a variety of courses. Airport. will also use some of the college's "There is a growing demand for The facility will be large enough to workshop facilities, which are now aircraft engineers throughout the world. accommodate three Boeing 747 jumbo being refurbished to provide airframe, The number of commercial aircraft in jets at any one time, and when complete systems and component overhaul training airline service is expected to increase by the mid-1990s will create more than workshops. substantially — from 7,500 to 12,500 900 new jobs. — by the end of the decade," he said. Planning is at an advanced stage, and The first intake of approximately 25 students will start in May. This will be a "In addition, existing aircraft are being work is expected to start on the site later mechanics conversion course lasting 16 subjected to increasingly intensive this year, with the bays coming into weeks, designed for skilled mechanics maintenance. service progressively from 1993 onwards. who have received their initial training "Our research suggests that by the Planning consent for the project has in other industries and who wish to year 2000 there could be a world already been received from Solihull move into the fast-growing world of Council, subject to final approval of shortage of 140,000 licensed aircraft aircraft maintenance. engineers, and some studies put the technical details on which professional figure even higher." studies are in hand. The Solihull course will be followed by a period of on-the-job training with In addition to contract engineering Qualitair Aviation Group, Long- the company, which provides teams of — in locations ranging from Frankfurt engineers and technicians on contract to to Kuala Lumpur — the training school stanton House, Longstanton, Cam­ airlines and overhaul agencies in the UK will also provide a source of skilled bridge. Tel: 0954 780174. and around the world. Other conversion courses will start at regular intervals, and apprentice training will commence in the autumn, again creating career opportunities with Qualitair and in the industry generally. In addition to providing for the group's own future requirements, discussions have already taken place with a number of airlines around the world with a view to providing training of this kind on a contract basis. The school will also offer training courses to aircraft technicians leading to qualification as licensed aircraft engineers — the select body of engineers authorised to "sign of f an aircraft for flight. These 18 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING — April 1991 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Tackling The Skills Crisis

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 63 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb037085
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tackling The Skills Crisis AN aircraft maintenance company and a college of technology have joined forces to tackle a major skills crisis in the aviation industry. The new join t venture brings together Qualitair Aviation Group and Solihull College of Technology, and will open its doors in May. Known as the Qualitair School of Aircraft Maintenance, it is planned to courses will be arranged for airline become the major independent centre in clients in addition to Qualitair staff. the UK specialising in training aircraft David Johnson, Qualitair group's maintenance engineers and technicians. engineering director, says that when the school is fully operational, in about workers for the new £50 million aircraft The school is based on the Solihull three years time, more than 1,000 maintenance facility which Qualitair is college campus, where construction of a purpose-built teaching and administra­ students a year will pass through its planning at Birmingham International tion building is now well advanced. It doors on a variety of courses. Airport. will also use some of the college's "There is a growing demand for The facility will be large enough to workshop facilities, which are now aircraft engineers throughout the world. accommodate three Boeing 747 jumbo being refurbished to provide airframe, The number of commercial aircraft in jets at any one time, and when complete systems and component overhaul training airline service is expected to increase by the mid-1990s will create more than workshops. substantially — from 7,500 to 12,500 900 new jobs. — by the end of the decade," he said. Planning is at an advanced stage, and The first intake of approximately 25 students will start in May. This will be a "In addition, existing aircraft are being work is expected to start on the site later mechanics conversion course lasting 16 subjected to increasingly intensive this year, with the bays coming into weeks, designed for skilled mechanics maintenance. service progressively from 1993 onwards. who have received their initial training "Our research suggests that by the Planning consent for the project has in other industries and who wish to year 2000 there could be a world already been received from Solihull move into the fast-growing world of Council, subject to final approval of shortage of 140,000 licensed aircraft aircraft maintenance. engineers, and some studies put the technical details on which professional figure even higher." studies are in hand. The Solihull course will be followed by a period of on-the-job training with In addition to contract engineering Qualitair Aviation Group, Long- the company, which provides teams of — in locations ranging from Frankfurt engineers and technicians on contract to to Kuala Lumpur — the training school stanton House, Longstanton, Cam­ airlines and overhaul agencies in the UK will also provide a source of skilled bridge. Tel: 0954 780174. and around the world. Other conversion courses will start at regular intervals, and apprentice training will commence in the autumn, again creating career opportunities with Qualitair and in the industry generally. In addition to providing for the group's own future requirements, discussions have already taken place with a number of airlines around the world with a view to providing training of this kind on a contract basis. The school will also offer training courses to aircraft technicians leading to qualification as licensed aircraft engineers — the select body of engineers authorised to "sign of f an aircraft for flight. These 18 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING — April 1991

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1991

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