Tacit knowledge sharing, self‐efficacy theory, and application to the Open Source community

Tacit knowledge sharing, self‐efficacy theory, and application to the Open Source community Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization. Design/methodology/approach – Current literature on tacit knowledge sharing and information about the Open Source community is synthesized in the study with research concerning self‐efficacy formation. The knowledge‐sharing literature is applied in the paper to the self‐efficacy model. Findings – Through a synthesis of different streams of literature, the paper concludes that the self‐efficacy model serves as a useful framework for better understanding the effects of context on tacit knowledge sharing. Furthermore, it is concluded that the Open Source community may provide an ideal set of subjects to whom the model can be applied. Research limitations/implications – Only propositions are offered, and the conclusions are suggestions for future research. The self‐efficacy model has been successfully applied to other areas of research in early stages (e.g. entrepreneurship) and provides a valid, tangible framework that allows many research possibilities. Practical implications – The self‐efficacy model is practical and usable in a real‐world situation. A software manager (or other manager) can easily look at the inputs and outcomes of the model and see where he/she could positively affect tacit knowledge sharing. Originality/value – This paper takes a highly valid and respected model and applies it to individual tacit knowledge sharing, a field in which little cross‐discipline work is done. This paper bridges a central organizational behavior/psychological theory with knowledge management research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Knowledge Management Emerald Publishing

Tacit knowledge sharing, self‐efficacy theory, and application to the Open Source community

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/tacit-knowledge-sharing-self-efficacy-theory-and-application-to-the-oR06RcKDP0
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1367-3270
DOI
10.1108/13673270710752135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization. Design/methodology/approach – Current literature on tacit knowledge sharing and information about the Open Source community is synthesized in the study with research concerning self‐efficacy formation. The knowledge‐sharing literature is applied in the paper to the self‐efficacy model. Findings – Through a synthesis of different streams of literature, the paper concludes that the self‐efficacy model serves as a useful framework for better understanding the effects of context on tacit knowledge sharing. Furthermore, it is concluded that the Open Source community may provide an ideal set of subjects to whom the model can be applied. Research limitations/implications – Only propositions are offered, and the conclusions are suggestions for future research. The self‐efficacy model has been successfully applied to other areas of research in early stages (e.g. entrepreneurship) and provides a valid, tangible framework that allows many research possibilities. Practical implications – The self‐efficacy model is practical and usable in a real‐world situation. A software manager (or other manager) can easily look at the inputs and outcomes of the model and see where he/she could positively affect tacit knowledge sharing. Originality/value – This paper takes a highly valid and respected model and applies it to individual tacit knowledge sharing, a field in which little cross‐discipline work is done. This paper bridges a central organizational behavior/psychological theory with knowledge management research.

Journal

Journal of Knowledge ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 5, 2007

Keywords: Knowledge management; Open systems; Public domain software; Knowledge sharing

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month