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Sustainable talent pipelines and person-organisation fit: strategic insights from UK graduates

Sustainable talent pipelines and person-organisation fit: strategic insights from UK graduates Drawing on a framework of person-organisation fit (POF) theory, this paper aims to understand how organisations can establish and maintain sustainable early-career talent pipelines. Research question one asks, “How do graduates feel that organisations can attract early-career talent?” Research question two asks, ‘What can employers learn from graduate perspectives about the retention of early-career talent?Design/methodology/approachTwenty-eight graduates from UK universities participated in semi-structured interviews in early 2022. Cohort one was composed of 15 individuals who graduated in 2008. Cohort two was composed of 13 individuals who graduated in 2020.FindingsThe findings identified two themes associated with attracting early-career talent: “Company Culture” and “Supply and Demand”. However, 2020 graduates prioritised the job role and job security, whereas 2008 graduates prioritised job location and commute duration. Three additional themes were related to the retention of early-career talent: “Career Progression”, “Health and Well-being” and “Remuneration”. Findings also highlighted how POF could evolve over time, whereby retention can be beneficial or detrimental to either party.Practical implicationsThe study identifies pragmatic approaches to attracting and retaining early-career talent and understanding how graduates' views on POF evolve over time.Originality/valueThe study extends POF research and bridges the shared sustainability themes of “person”, “context” and “time” from vocational behaviour and HRM literature streams. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Career Development International Emerald Publishing

Sustainable talent pipelines and person-organisation fit: strategic insights from UK graduates

Career Development International , Volume 28 (2): 16 – Apr 27, 2023

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References (48)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1362-0436
DOI
10.1108/cdi-10-2022-0285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drawing on a framework of person-organisation fit (POF) theory, this paper aims to understand how organisations can establish and maintain sustainable early-career talent pipelines. Research question one asks, “How do graduates feel that organisations can attract early-career talent?” Research question two asks, ‘What can employers learn from graduate perspectives about the retention of early-career talent?Design/methodology/approachTwenty-eight graduates from UK universities participated in semi-structured interviews in early 2022. Cohort one was composed of 15 individuals who graduated in 2008. Cohort two was composed of 13 individuals who graduated in 2020.FindingsThe findings identified two themes associated with attracting early-career talent: “Company Culture” and “Supply and Demand”. However, 2020 graduates prioritised the job role and job security, whereas 2008 graduates prioritised job location and commute duration. Three additional themes were related to the retention of early-career talent: “Career Progression”, “Health and Well-being” and “Remuneration”. Findings also highlighted how POF could evolve over time, whereby retention can be beneficial or detrimental to either party.Practical implicationsThe study identifies pragmatic approaches to attracting and retaining early-career talent and understanding how graduates' views on POF evolve over time.Originality/valueThe study extends POF research and bridges the shared sustainability themes of “person”, “context” and “time” from vocational behaviour and HRM literature streams.

Journal

Career Development InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 27, 2023

Keywords: Person-organisation fit; Sustainability; Strategic HRM; Talent management; Early-career; Attraction; Retention

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