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Surface Roughness and Wing Drag

Surface Roughness and Wing Drag DURING the past eight or ten years the speeds of most types of aeroplanes have been practically doubled. Part of this impressive advance has resulted from the use of increased power, but most of it has come from the reduction of aerodynamic drag. The largest and most obvious builtin head winds such as exposed engine cylinders, landing gear struts and wires were first eliminated and attention was then directed to successively smaller factors. The stage has now been reached where it is necessary to consider the effects on drag of such items as rivets, sheetmetal joints and other irregularities on the surfaces exposed to air flow. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Surface Roughness and Wing Drag

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030538
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DURING the past eight or ten years the speeds of most types of aeroplanes have been practically doubled. Part of this impressive advance has resulted from the use of increased power, but most of it has come from the reduction of aerodynamic drag. The largest and most obvious builtin head winds such as exposed engine cylinders, landing gear struts and wires were first eliminated and attention was then directed to successively smaller factors. The stage has now been reached where it is necessary to consider the effects on drag of such items as rivets, sheetmetal joints and other irregularities on the surfaces exposed to air flow.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1939

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