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SUPPORT FROM AMERICA

SUPPORT FROM AMERICA November, 1941 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 299 more rapid general evolution and progress. One obviously dele­ terious effect of this secrecy is tha t it has the result of tying the hands of industrial research associations, because there is a tendency, not Aircraf t Engineering only to keep from them information of advances in technique made individually, but frequently even to hide from them knowledge Devote d to th e Science an d Practice of Aero­ of problems and difficulties that are encountered in practice, on account of a fear that if these are brought to the notice of an asso­ nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary ciation's research workers the solutions of them will be divulged to other members. We are honestly convinced that there is a con­ siderable number of problems awaiting solution in many branches of Brandie s of th e Engineering Industry engineering that arc held up for this reason. The ridiculous position is in some instances arrived at that research associations actually Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. send members of their staffs abroad to countries—such as the United States—where this view docs not find support, so that they may ask for, and receive, information which they cannot easily Vol . XIII , No . 153 November 1941 obtain at home. Procedure in Wartime However, whatever may be the rights or wrongs so far as individ­ ual commercial development is concerned, we should not have E arc greatly beholden to our friends in America for thought there could be any question as to the correct procedure in the two most interesting "appreciations" of enemy produc­ wartime in regard to information gained by those in a privileged tions which, through their courtesy and co-operation, we are position to do so. We should have thought that it was a duty on able to publish for the benefit of readers at home and in other lands. their part to disseminate it freely and as widely as possible to all concerned, or even interested. The best way is to communicate it either to the appropriate technical society or institution, so that Explanation and Justification it may be published in its transactions, or direct to the technical The description of the Mercedes-Ben/, engine, which we conclude press. In either case it will in fact become available to the press, in this issue, also appears in the Transactions of the Society of since most institutions permit external publication ; though in some Automotive Engineers, having been read at the semi-Annual instances insisting, quite legitimately, on prior publication in their Meeting of the Society, but such duplication as this entails will not own organ. affect more than a very small percentage of our readers, even in the In our view, as we stated two months ago, the most desirable United States, and the benefit of bringing it before others far out­ method would be for the Ministry of Aircraft Production to issue weighs this slight overlap. We do not imagine, for example, that the reports, which it is almost inconceivable arc not already pre­ more than a few of the readers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING among pared, on captured examples of enemy machines and engines. We the U.S. Army Air Corps will have the opportunity of seeing the cannot imagine what disservice it can be thought this would do to S.A.E. Journal and the small number affected will, we have no the war effort and it would certainly be an enormous benefit to doubt, gladly overlook this for the sake of the common weal. technical staffs in the industry—particularly in the junior grades. Our republication of the notes on the twin-engined Messerschmitt Meanwhile, we arc, as we have already said, deeply indebted to Mel 10 from the pages of Aero Digest will perhaps affect a somewhat MESSRS. R. W. YOUNG and J. E. THOMPSON and to the SOCIETY OF wider circle of our American subscribers, but they too, will, we AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS and the EDITOR OF AERO DIGEST for so hope, feel that our action is justified by the good done in bringing readily according us the necessary permission to reprint here their this interesting article to the notice of the British aeronautical world contributions to knowledge of these two German products. and our readers in other countries overseas. The fact that both these descriptions, of an enemy engine and An Unjustifiable Conclusion aeroplane, both captured in England and made available to engineers There is one comment made by MR. YOUNG to which our attention in the United States for their information and instruction, should has been called. In summarizing his comparisons of the materials come back to us from America for the benefit of those interested in used in the Mercedes-Benz and the Wright Cyclone engines he re­ this country is an ironical commentary on what we wrote in Septem­ marks'(see p. 279 of the October issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING), ber under the heading " A Plea for Enlightenment." "Comparison of the steel compositions shows a tendency towards elimination of nickel which may indicate a potential shortage of this Opposed National Outlooks strategic material." (In this connexion readers may also be referred to "Nickel—Its Uses and Sources," by J . H. Robertson, AIRCRAFT The truth is that there is a fundamental difference in outlook in ENGINEERING, Vol. XI, June, 1939, pp. 233-40.) MR. R. W. the two countries in regard to the dissemination of information. ALLOTT of NITRALLOY LIMITED writes, "Thi s reduction in the nickel In England—in peace time hardly less than in war—there is an content in those steels which are to be nitrided is due to the fact that ineradicable feeling, almost amounting to an inhibition, that detailed nickel has a harmful effect on the physical properties of the steels knowledge is a closely-guarded secret to be kept carefully wrapped after nitriding and, consequently, the nickel content must be kept in the bosom of the individual. In America, the precisely opposite as low as possible. Thus in the steel used by the Germans for their view is held and, generally speaking, anyone who is in the fortunate Piston Pins the nickel content is nil because the pins are subse­ position of becoming well-informed on any matter looks upon his quently nitrided, whereas the American pins of a steel containing knowledge as matter to share with others and accord the widest 3·25 to 4·0 per cent are not nitrided." He concludes that is not, circulation. We have no shadow of doubt that the American attitude therefore, safe to draw the conclusion arrived at by MR. YOUNG. is the sounder. LEASE AND LEND An Ostrich-like Attitude In order to remove all possibility of the susceptibilities of certain We go so far as to say that the common English insistence on circles in America being wounded, we arc asked to state that "the keeping within the knowledge of members of a single firm the results fact that goods made of raw materials in short supply owing to of experimental development, in the long run very frequently hampers progress even by the individual company concerned. war conditions arc advertized in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should We arc, at any rate, very sure that the American habit of more not be taken as an indication that they are necessarily available willingly proclaiming such advances "o n the house-tops" leads to for export." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

SUPPORT FROM AMERICA

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 13 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1941

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030838
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

November, 1941 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 299 more rapid general evolution and progress. One obviously dele­ terious effect of this secrecy is tha t it has the result of tying the hands of industrial research associations, because there is a tendency, not Aircraf t Engineering only to keep from them information of advances in technique made individually, but frequently even to hide from them knowledge Devote d to th e Science an d Practice of Aero­ of problems and difficulties that are encountered in practice, on account of a fear that if these are brought to the notice of an asso­ nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary ciation's research workers the solutions of them will be divulged to other members. We are honestly convinced that there is a con­ siderable number of problems awaiting solution in many branches of Brandie s of th e Engineering Industry engineering that arc held up for this reason. The ridiculous position is in some instances arrived at that research associations actually Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. send members of their staffs abroad to countries—such as the United States—where this view docs not find support, so that they may ask for, and receive, information which they cannot easily Vol . XIII , No . 153 November 1941 obtain at home. Procedure in Wartime However, whatever may be the rights or wrongs so far as individ­ ual commercial development is concerned, we should not have E arc greatly beholden to our friends in America for thought there could be any question as to the correct procedure in the two most interesting "appreciations" of enemy produc­ wartime in regard to information gained by those in a privileged tions which, through their courtesy and co-operation, we are position to do so. We should have thought that it was a duty on able to publish for the benefit of readers at home and in other lands. their part to disseminate it freely and as widely as possible to all concerned, or even interested. The best way is to communicate it either to the appropriate technical society or institution, so that Explanation and Justification it may be published in its transactions, or direct to the technical The description of the Mercedes-Ben/, engine, which we conclude press. In either case it will in fact become available to the press, in this issue, also appears in the Transactions of the Society of since most institutions permit external publication ; though in some Automotive Engineers, having been read at the semi-Annual instances insisting, quite legitimately, on prior publication in their Meeting of the Society, but such duplication as this entails will not own organ. affect more than a very small percentage of our readers, even in the In our view, as we stated two months ago, the most desirable United States, and the benefit of bringing it before others far out­ method would be for the Ministry of Aircraft Production to issue weighs this slight overlap. We do not imagine, for example, that the reports, which it is almost inconceivable arc not already pre­ more than a few of the readers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING among pared, on captured examples of enemy machines and engines. We the U.S. Army Air Corps will have the opportunity of seeing the cannot imagine what disservice it can be thought this would do to S.A.E. Journal and the small number affected will, we have no the war effort and it would certainly be an enormous benefit to doubt, gladly overlook this for the sake of the common weal. technical staffs in the industry—particularly in the junior grades. Our republication of the notes on the twin-engined Messerschmitt Meanwhile, we arc, as we have already said, deeply indebted to Mel 10 from the pages of Aero Digest will perhaps affect a somewhat MESSRS. R. W. YOUNG and J. E. THOMPSON and to the SOCIETY OF wider circle of our American subscribers, but they too, will, we AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS and the EDITOR OF AERO DIGEST for so hope, feel that our action is justified by the good done in bringing readily according us the necessary permission to reprint here their this interesting article to the notice of the British aeronautical world contributions to knowledge of these two German products. and our readers in other countries overseas. The fact that both these descriptions, of an enemy engine and An Unjustifiable Conclusion aeroplane, both captured in England and made available to engineers There is one comment made by MR. YOUNG to which our attention in the United States for their information and instruction, should has been called. In summarizing his comparisons of the materials come back to us from America for the benefit of those interested in used in the Mercedes-Benz and the Wright Cyclone engines he re­ this country is an ironical commentary on what we wrote in Septem­ marks'(see p. 279 of the October issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING), ber under the heading " A Plea for Enlightenment." "Comparison of the steel compositions shows a tendency towards elimination of nickel which may indicate a potential shortage of this Opposed National Outlooks strategic material." (In this connexion readers may also be referred to "Nickel—Its Uses and Sources," by J . H. Robertson, AIRCRAFT The truth is that there is a fundamental difference in outlook in ENGINEERING, Vol. XI, June, 1939, pp. 233-40.) MR. R. W. the two countries in regard to the dissemination of information. ALLOTT of NITRALLOY LIMITED writes, "Thi s reduction in the nickel In England—in peace time hardly less than in war—there is an content in those steels which are to be nitrided is due to the fact that ineradicable feeling, almost amounting to an inhibition, that detailed nickel has a harmful effect on the physical properties of the steels knowledge is a closely-guarded secret to be kept carefully wrapped after nitriding and, consequently, the nickel content must be kept in the bosom of the individual. In America, the precisely opposite as low as possible. Thus in the steel used by the Germans for their view is held and, generally speaking, anyone who is in the fortunate Piston Pins the nickel content is nil because the pins are subse­ position of becoming well-informed on any matter looks upon his quently nitrided, whereas the American pins of a steel containing knowledge as matter to share with others and accord the widest 3·25 to 4·0 per cent are not nitrided." He concludes that is not, circulation. We have no shadow of doubt that the American attitude therefore, safe to draw the conclusion arrived at by MR. YOUNG. is the sounder. LEASE AND LEND An Ostrich-like Attitude In order to remove all possibility of the susceptibilities of certain We go so far as to say that the common English insistence on circles in America being wounded, we arc asked to state that "the keeping within the knowledge of members of a single firm the results fact that goods made of raw materials in short supply owing to of experimental development, in the long run very frequently hampers progress even by the individual company concerned. war conditions arc advertized in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should We arc, at any rate, very sure that the American habit of more not be taken as an indication that they are necessarily available willingly proclaiming such advances "o n the house-tops" leads to for export."

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1941

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